Previous month:
September 2010
Next month:
November 2010

Michael Cudahy gives $2 million to UWM Innovation Par

Chancellor's departure, replacement's support for center paves way for donation

By Tom Daykin of the Journal Sentinel

Oct. 25, 2010

Last year's high-profile break between retired business executive Michael Cudahy and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has been mended - to the tune of $2 million that Cudahy says he'll donate to help fund UWM's Innovation Park development.

And that's largely due to the recent departure of UWM Chancellor Carlos Santiago, and support for his interim replacement, a university official who Cudahy says is strongly committed to the project.

Cudahy said Monday he would not have considered making the donation if Santiago were still chancellor. Innovation Park, planned for the County Grounds in Wauwatosa, would include a science research facility and privately developed buildings for technology-oriented companies.

Full story.


University, business partnerships urged to create more start-ups

By Tom Daykin of the Journal Sentinel

Oct. 25, 2010

Partnerships between university researchers and private businesses, including those envisioned for University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Innovation Park, are needed to help start companies in the Milwaukee area, speakers at a panel discussion said Monday.

However, similar efforts in other communities generally have not brought substantial job growth, one speaker said, and project backers should not oversell academic research as a "silver bullet" solution to lost jobs and Milwaukee's swelling number of poor families.

That latter view came from Marc Levine, a UWM history professor who's done research on economic development efforts. Levine and the other panel speakers - Jay Bayne, Milwaukee Institute executive director; Daniel Steininger, BizStarts Milwaukee co-founder; and Tom Still, Wisconsin Technology Council president - spoke to about 250 people at an event organized by the Public Policy Forum.

Full story.


Scientists find more efficient, safer way to reprogram cells

By Mark Johnson of the Journal Sentinel

Sept. 30, 2010

Almost three years after the first scientists reprogrammed human cells in Madison and Kyoto, Japan, researchers in Boston have developed a new process that appears to eliminate one of the major safety concerns while dramatically increasing the efficiency of the process.

The method, which uses RNA rather than inserted genes, was not only successful in returning adult human cells to the embryonic state, but also in guiding these powerful cells to different fates and even in changing skin cells to muscle cells directly. Such a technology, if proven completely safe, could provide an alternative to embryonic stem cells, allowing scientists to create and bank different cells for therapies, drug testing and the study of diseases.

Full story.