UW-Stout: 8th Annual Manufacturing Advantage Conference & Technology Showcase November 4-5, 2015

University of Wisconsin - Stout Campus: Menomonie, Wisconsin

The Manufacturing Advantage Conference provides a forum for manufacturers from across the region to learn best practices and participate in practical learning through interactive, hands-on breakout sessions, industry-expert keynote speakers and ample networking opportunities. We strive to carry on a solid tradition of providing impactful experiences to help manufacturers succeed in the areas of strategic direction, top-line growth, process improvement and people and culture.

More Information.


Lovell looks to boost Marquette research

Marquette University President Michael Lovell says he wants to double research at Marquette over the next five years.

Speaking at Thursday’s WIN-Milwaukee meeting, Lovell highlighted investments the university has made in facilities and programs that foster innovation, including the purchase of 12.5 acres in downtown Milwaukee that will house an athletic research facility. Developed in partnership with the Milwaukee Bucks and an unnamed health care provider, Lovell said the facility will provide a global draw to the university.

Full story.

 


From pluripotency to totipotency

While it is already possible to obtain in vitro pluripotent cells (ie, cells capable of generating all tissues of an embryo) from any cell type, researchers from Maria-Elena Torres-Padilla’s team have pushed the limits of science even further. They managed to obtain totipotent cells with the same characteristics as those of the earliest embryonic stages and with even more interesting properties. Obtained in collaboration with Juanma Vaquerizas from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine (Münster, Germany), these results are published on 3rd of August in the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.

Just after fertilization, when the embryo is comprised of only 1 or 2 cells, cells are “totipotent“, that is to say, capable of producing an entire embryo as well as the placenta and umbilical cord that accompany it. During the subsequent rounds of cell division, cells rapidly lose this plasticity and become “pluripotent”. At the blastocyst stage (about thirty cells), the so-called “embryonic stem cells” can differentiate into any tissue, although they alone cannot give birth to a foetus anymore. Pluripotent cells then continue to specialise and form the various tissues of the body through a process called cellular differentiation.

For some years, it has been possible to re-programme differentiated cells into pluripotent ones, but not into totipotent cells. Now, the team of Maria-Elena Torres-Padilla has studied the characteristics of totipotent cells of the embryo and found factors capable of inducing a totipotent-like state.

Full story.


Programming adult stem cells to treat muscular dystrophy and more by mimicking nature

"Inducing Stem Cell Myogenesis Using NanoScript" ACS Nano

Stem cells hold great potential for addressing a variety of conditions from spinal cord injuries to cancer, but they can be difficult to control. Scientists are now reporting in the journal ACS Nano a new way to mimic the body’s natural approach to programming these cells. Using this method, they successfully directed adult stem cells to turn specifically into muscle, which could potentially help treat patients with muscular dystrophy.

Full story.


Boosting gas mileage by turning engine heat into electricity

"Thermoelectric Power Generation from Lanthanum Strontium Titanium Oxide at Room Temperature Through the Addition of Graphene" ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

Automakers are looking for ways to improve their fleets’ average fuel efficiency, and scientists may have a new way to help them. In a report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, one team reports the development of a material that could convert engine heat that’s otherwise wasted into electrical energy to help keep a car running — and reduce the need for fuels. It could also have applications in aerospace, manufacturing and other sectors.

Full story.


Wisconsin doctor's invention could benefit patients, investors

By Kathleen Gallagher of the Journal Sentinel

Nearly 10 years ago, Bradley Glenn, a Green Bay doctor, saw a need for a less-invasive way to deliver chemotherapy, antibiotics and nutrients to his patients.

His solution has become the core of a small Wisconsin start-up that is aiming to deliver a big payday to investors.

Stealth Therapeutics Inc. on Tuesday will begin a trial at two Wisconsin health care organizations to determine the best potential market for the company's Invisiport, a vascular access port that is implanted under the skin in a patient's arm.

"Our goal is to use the results from the study to ramp up use of the Invisiport throughout the country," said Sam Adams, Stealth's general manager. "Future commercial success will help us to create a return for our shareholders."

In essence, the study is intended to show potential acquirers how much value the device could add to their product mix, said Ken Johnson, a director of Stealth and the managing director of Kegonsa Capital Partners. Kegonsa is a major investor in Stealth, which has raised a total of $3.35 million, Adams said.

Full story


Elastic Gel to Heal Wounds

A team of bioengineers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), led by Ali Khademhosseini, PhD, and Nasim Annabi, PhD, of the Biomedical Engineering Division, has developed a new protein-based gel that, when exposed to light, mimics many of the properties of elastic tissue, such as skin and blood vessels. In a paper published in Advanced Functional Materials, the research team reports on the new material’s key properties, many of which can be finely tuned, and on the results of using the material in preclinical models of wound healing.

“We are very interested in engineering strong, elastic materials from proteins because so many of the tissues within the human body are elastic. If we want to use biomaterials to regenerate those tissues, we need elasticity and flexibility,” said Annabi, a co-senior author of the study. “Our hydrogel is very flexible, made from a biocompatible polypeptide and can be activated using light.”

Full story


UW-Madison: Dark energy to be topic of Space Place event

"To Infinity and Beyond: The Accelerating Universe," a live broadcast from the World Science Festival about dark energy, an antigravitational force that confounds the conventional laws of physics, will be hosted on the evening of May 28 by UW-Madison'sSpace Place.

Originating from New York and moderated by internationally known theoretical physicist and bestselling author Lawrence Krauss, the broadcast will take place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Space Place, the UW-Madison astronomy outreach outpost, is located in the Villager Mall, 2300 S. Park St. The event will be held in the mall atrium.

Full posting.


Scientists stumble across unknown stem-cell type

‘Region-selective’ pluripotent cells raise possibility of growing human organs in animals.

Sara Reardon

06 May 2015

 A newly discovered type of stem cell could help provide a model for early human development — and, eventually, allow human organs to be grown in large animals such as pigs or cows for research or therapeutic purposes.

Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, a developmental biologist at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, and his colleagues stumbled across a previously unknown variety of pluripotent cell — which can give rise to any type of tissue — while attempting to graft human pluripotent stem cells into mouse embryos.

Scientists previously knew about two other types of pluripotent stem cells, but growing them in large numbers or guiding them to mature into specific types of adult cells has proven difficult. Writing in Nature, Izpisua Belmonte and his colleagues report a type of pluripotent cell that is easier to grow in vitro and grafts into an embryo when injected into the right spot. They call them region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs).

Full story.


UWM receives $300,000 to create 'Innovation Corps' site

UWM receives $300,000 to create 'Innovation Corps' site

By Kathleen Gallagher of the Journal Sentinel April 21, 2015

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $300,000, three-year grant to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to become an "Innovation Corps" site to recruit and train 90 teams to commercialize their research over the next three years.

UWM is collaborating on the project with Marquette University, Medical College of Wisconsin, the Milwaukee School of Engineering and Concordia University Wisconsin.

The I-Corps program, part of the federal agency's National Innovation Network, is the "gold standard" for accelerating ideas into the marketplace, said Brian Thompson, president of the UWM Research Foundation.

"This is a way to excite faculty about entrepreneurial thinking and how research can be applied to real products that can get to market," said Ilya Avdeev, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Milwaukee program.

Full story