Next month:
November 2004

WI Venture Capitalists

Wisconsin home to venture capitalists
Column
By Tom Murphy
Wisconsin, known best for milk and cheese, paper and paper machinery and boats and fire engines, long has yearned to broaden that spectrum.

The state wants - and needs - to attract venture capital to complement, accompany, and some day succeed, its manufacturing legacies.

Some Wisconsin venture capitalists, including the handful in metropolitan Green Bay, are very private entities. They are primarily family based but network effectively to create investment funds and spread risk.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Ron Hamilton made his fortune with disposable lenses

Sunday Herald - 31 October 2004
New contact lens triumph for a man of vision
Ron Hamilton made his fortune with disposable lenses. Now he’s back in the frame with another development. Valerie Darroch reports


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


ANYONE seeking a lesson on the value of intellectual property should have a chat with Scottish serial entrepreneur and contact lens pioneer Ron Hamilton.
Four years ago global eyecare giant Bausch & Lomb paid $15 million for 15 pages of intellectual property rights relating to the manufacturing process Hamilton invented to create high-quality disposable one-day wear contact lenses.

“That was $1m dollars for every page of the patent,” smiles Hamilton.

Hamilton sold Award, the business he founded in Livingston to make one-day disposable lenses, to Bausch & Lomb in 1996 for about $33m, and the US firm had retained a four-year option on the intellectual property rights.

Hamilton reasoned that either Bausch & Lomb could “invent its way out of having to pay for it”, keep paying royalties to Hamilton and his partner Bill Seden, or buy the IP rights.

Despite the huge research and development resources at its disposal, around seven years after Hamilton and Seden made their technology breakthrough in a mini-lab in Hamilton’s back garden, Bausch & Lomb had still not cracked a better way of making the lenses without infringing the duo’s patent.

Hamilton tots up the total payout Bausch and Lomb has made since it took over the company in 1996. “They paid us $48m in all – that’s $1m for every month we were in the building,” he says.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

International Intellectual Property Conference


The 2004 Seoul International Intellectual Property Conference began on Saturday, with the theme of "Global Commercialization of Technology Upgrades in the Asia Pacific Rim".

The Conference, co-sponsored by the International Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property (AIPPI) Korea and the Licensing Executives Society (LES) Korea continues until Tuesday at the Westin Chosun Hotel. This is the 7th Conference on Intellectual Property held by AIPPI Korea and LES Korea.

This year's conference features informative and practical presentations on a variety of topics related to intellectual property. The main forum offers eight separate sessions discussing International Trends in Intellectual Property, Inventions Under Joint R&D of Research Institutes/Universities, Protection and Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights, Information Technology and e-Commerce/Business, Patent Infringement and Alternate Dispute Resolution, Brand and Commercialization, Patent Management Strategy and Global Strategy on the Automotive Industry. Most of the speakers at the conference are notable experts who have years of experience and expertise in the field of intellectual property.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

GE to Launch New CodeLink Assay Within Two Weeks

GE to Launch New CodeLink Assay Within Two Weeks
By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

TORONTO, Oct. 30 (GenomeWeb News) - GE Healthcare will launch its overdue 16-chamber rat ADME assay for the CodeLink platform by the middle of November, said Lisa D’Anzi, marketing director for the platform, yesterday at the American Society of Human Genetics 54th annual meeting.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Nano Insurance

TECHNOLOGY
Size Matters
Welcome to the wild and wooly world of nanotechnology, the dwelling place of nanotubes, nanoshells, fullerenes, "buckyballs," quantum dots and nanowhiskers. These objects are measured in the billionth-scale. As the size of these products shrink further, their risk in industrial use increases. Insurers remain wary.

BY MICHAEL FITZPATRICK

Call it the Nanotechnology Revolution. The tiniest substances promise to transform industry and create a huge market. In chemicals, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, technology and textiles, businesses are researching and manufacturing products based on nanotechnology, which uses bits of matter measured in billionths of a meter. The technology, utilizing materials a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair, is showing up in everything from auto parts to sunscreens and clothing.

The market for nanotechnology products is expected to grow to around $200 billion in 2010 from about $50 billion in 2001, according to industry estimates, and could exceed $1 trillion within 15 years, the National Science Foundation has estimated. These are big numbers indeed, particularly from such small phenomena.

While industry works to develop the promise of nanotechnology, insurers–badly burned by their experience with small substances such as asbestos–are expressing caution about the developing technology as new products enter the markets and potential liabilities build on their books.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Google and Trademarks

European Search Landscape - Search Engine Strategies Coverage

Barry Schwartz covering the Search Engine Strategies conference from Sweden.

I was a bit late getting to the Search Engine Strategies conference, but I made it here for the second track.

. . .

Q: The next question went into the trademark issue with bidding on trademark names. A person from Hilton asked how do we control the usage of these words?
A: Google said is has been a challenge, they ask trademark owners to let them know. Google needs the direct involvement from the trademark owners. Overture said that they operate a lot like Google with this in the European market.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Stolichnaya

Allied Domecq faces suit in vodka fight

By ALEX NICHOLSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

MOSCOW (AP) - The state-run Russian company that claims the rights to Stolichnaya vodka has targeted British spirits and wine group Allied Domecq in its fight to control the hundreds of millions of dollars in annual sales of the famed Russian vodka in the United States.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Donuts

Krispy Kreme Vs. Krispy Kream

POSTED: 6:54 p.m. EDT October 29, 2004


Cambria County -- Channel 6 News asked people Friday when you hear Krispy Kreme, what do you think of?

Good donuts." "Donuts." "Donuts." "An Ice Cream Cone."


Ice cream cone? Yes. That's what Krispy Kream Drive In on Route 422 in Cambria County sells. The current owners have been in Belsano since 1968.

Christina Hoover owns the Ice Cream shop with her husband. She tells Channel 6 News, "We're an ice cream fast food stand. It's a drive in."

And business is good. Then in the past month two letters from Krispy Kreme donuts. The corporation is not happy with them. But it's not about donuts and ice cream. The problem has to do with the name. Krispy Kreme donuts wants Krispy Kream Drive In to change theirs.

Amy Hughes is the Communications Director for Krispy Kreme. She tells Channel 6 News, "Unfortunately this business is violating a federal regulation trademark that we've had since 1951. And we've respectfully requested that they cease doing so within a reasonable amount of time."

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Two Arrested for Selling Fake Designer Bags

Cindy Cesare, Reporter
Two Arrested for Selling Fake Designer Bags
(Oct. 29) -- If you've ever been to a purse party filled with inexpensive knock-off designer bags and jewelry, Metro police, say you are contributing to the growing problem of counterfeit trafficking.

Metro police raided what appeared to be a non-descriptive office building on Friday. However thousands of women in the valley knew what the business really was -- a place to buy knock-off designer purses, shoes and jewelry.

"It appears to be a great deal when you can buy something for $400 that has a list price of $4,000 if it was real," said Sgt. Mike Bunker, Metro.

But the hundreds of Chanels, Louis Vittons and Christian Diors are not real. And that's why the store employees, 32-year-old Joe Bogar and 57-year-old Ann Lyerly, were arrested for trafficking a false trademark, which is a felony crime.


Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Appeal Filed in Nuclear Waste Storage Decision

Appeal Filed in Nuclear Waste Storage Decision
Oct. 29, 2004
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Utah's governor and attorney general want the U.S. Supreme Court to decide who has authority over the transportation and storage of nuclear waste, the latest move in the battle to keep thousands of tons of radioactive waste out of the state.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Optical Computing Steps Forward

All-optical switch demonstrated by Cornell researchers


ITHACA, NY | 29 October 2004 -- Cornell University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a device that allows one low-powered beam of light to switch another on and off on silicon, a key component for future "photonic" microchips in which light replaces electrons.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Nano Memory

Memory applications seen driving nanotechnology's growth
By EE Times
October 29, 2004 (2:04 PM EDT)

WASHINGTON — A market researcher is projecting that emerging "nanomemory" technology will drive demand for nanoelectronics over the next three years.

NanoMarkets (Sterling, Va.) estimates that nanomemory products will account for $8.6 billion of its projected $10.8 billion in nanoelectronics growth through 2007. It said the main drivers of the technology will be nonvolatile memories for mobile communications and computing. The researchers said IBM Corp., STMicroelectronics and Freescale are all close to shipping memory products based on nanotechnology.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Optical Stimulation of Neurons

Researchers Devise Optical Method To Safely, Effectively Stimulate Neurons
Nashville, Tenn. – Biomedical engineers and physicians at Vanderbilt University have brought the day when artificial limbs will be controlled directly by the brain considerably closer by discovering a method that uses laser light, rather than electricity, to stimulate and control nerve cells.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Weekend Genetic Warrior

Bio Data-Cruncher Hits Jackpot

By Kari Lynn Dean

02:00 AM Oct. 28, 2004 PT

While surfing the internet not long ago, a Harvard biologist stumbled upon a pile of public research data including unpublished leftovers from an unresolved genetics study. It wasn't unusual: Data like that can be found all over the web.

But then 33-year-old biology professor Vamsi Mootha did something remarkable. Using a unique computational method, he mined the data and identified a gene underlying a rare but fatal pediatric disorder called Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian variant, or LSFC. Astonishingly, he did it in a single weekend.

. . .

A relatively new technology, called microarrays, enables interrogation of every gene to determine how active it is. Rather than just look at a slice of diseased cell tissue under a microscope, scientists can see how many of the 23,000 genes are switched on or off and to what degree. Multiply all that data by all the patients in research studies such as Mootha encountered, and the result is an intimidating mass of numbers to crunch and assess.

"Vamsi got a hold of the data from the internet, but he said you can't compare gene by gene. You'd be doing so many comparisons, you aren't going to find anything statistically significant," said Alan Attie, a University of Wisconsin biochemistry professor.

"Vamsi re-curated the list of genes, making about 120 categories by functional group," such as genes that make fat or carbohydrates, or control respiration, etc., Attie said. "It turned out that the mitochondrial respiration group showed a big difference. But looking at the individual gene level, there would have been only modest differences."

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Asian Biotech Ag Strategy

Friday, October 29, 2004
By Randy A. Hautea and Margarita Escaler

Crop improvement facilitated by modern biotechnology is one the most significant developments in plant biotechnology research and development (R&D). Within Asia, plant biotechnology has largely been acknowledged as a key strategy for achieving food security and sustainable agriculture; many governments give high priority to agricultural biotechnology R&D.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

IP Enforcement in Action

Homeland Security Agents Visit Small Toy Store in Oregon About Magic Cube
The Associated Press
Oct. 28, 2004 - So far as she knows, Pufferbelly Toys owner Stephanie Cox hasn't been passing any state secrets to sinister foreign governments, or violating obscure clauses in the Patriot Act.

So she was taken aback by a mysterious phone call from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to her small store in this quiet Columbia River town just north of Portland.

"I was shaking in my shoes," Cox said of the September phone call. "My first thought was the government can shut your business down on a whim, in my opinion. If I'm closed even for a day that would cause undue stress."

When the two agents arrived at the store, the lead agent asked Cox whether she carried a toy called the Magic Cube, which he said was an illegal copy of the Rubik's Cube, one of the most popular toys of all time.

He told her to remove the Magic Cube from her shelves, and he watched to make sure she complied.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Advances in Optics

Research round-up
28 October 2004

A look at some of the innovations in optics that have been reported in journals this month.

. . .

INTEGRATED OPTICS
In a move that could benefit chemical and biological sensing, researchers in the US have developed hollow optical waveguides that can guide liquids or gases.

. . .

LASER SURGERY
A research group from Poland's Military University of Technology, Warsaw, has produced a Q-switched Er:YAG laser set-up that delivers pulses as short as 91.2 ns with an energy of 137 mJ (at 3 Hz repetition rate).

. . .

PHOTONIC CRYSTAL FIBER
Scientists in the UK have developed an all-solid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) that acts as a high-performance bandgap filter.

. . .
LED
A team of researchers and engineers from the University of Strathclyde, UK, and HORIBA Jobin Yvon IBH has shown that a pulsed ultraviolet LED can act as a convenient source for exciting fluorescence from protein.

. . .

3D DISPLAY
A full-color auto stereoscopic three-dimensional display, which can be viewed without glasses, has been developed by researchers in South Korea.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

US-Russia Talk about IP

26 October 2004 15:29
Russia, US discuss intellectual property rights

A Russian-US working group on intellectual property rights opened a two-day meeting in Washington on 25 October. The working group discusses reforming the Russian legislation on intellectual property rights, fighting piracy, legal control of optical discs production, control of optical discs exports, and protection of confidential information related to manufacture of pharmaceutical products.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Bone Care May Be Doing Well

Bone Care gets federal subpoena

The Capital Times
October 28, 2004

MIDDLETON - Drug maker Bone Care International Inc. announced Wednesday that it received a subpoena from the U.S. Justice Department for a wide range of documents about its operations.

Bone Care officials could not be reached for comment, but the company said in a release that it intended to cooperate.

Robert W. Baird & Co. analyst Christopher Raymond, who follows the company, said in a report today that he didn't believe Bone Care's Hectorol drug was the focus of the investigation and "barring any major surprises" he expected little impact on Bone Care's business.

Full story.

Update from Wisconsin State Journal

Bone Care served with subpoena
9:50 pm 10/28/04
Judy Newman Wisconsin State Journal

. . .

At least four other companies also said they have received subpoenas looking for similar information. Quest Diagnostics, of Teterboro, N.J., has a subsidiary that sells test kits to clinics and dialysis centers. DaVita, of El Segundo, Calif.; Fresenius Medical Care, of Bad Homburg, Germany; and Renal Care Group, of Nashville, Tenn., operate large chains of dialysis centers.

DaVita said in a news release Tuesday that company officials think the subpoena they received is in connection with "a joint civil and criminal investigation" but "no proceedings have been initiated" against DaVita, as far as the company knows.

At least two reports from analysts say they don't think Bone Care or Hectorol are the target of the Justice Department probe.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Bone Care Doing Well

Things are Ritzy for Bone Care
10:31 pm 10/27/04
Judy Newman Wisconsin State Journal

Bone Care International is moving to the next level.

With three products on the market and three profitable quarters in a row, the local pharmaceutical company is putting on the Ritz.

Its annual stockholders meeting next month - traditionally held at the company's Middleton office or, more recently, at a nearby hotel - will be at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Chicago instead.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Bone Care enjoys record quarter

Bone Care enjoys record quarter

By Jeff Richgels
October 28, 2004

MIDDLETON -- Drug maker Bone Care International Inc. recorded the best quarter of its 17-year existence in the three months ended Sept. 30, thanks to booming sales of its lead drug.

Bone Care posted fiscal 2005 first quarter net income of $1.2 million, or 6 cents per diluted share, on sales of $17.4 million, compared to a year-ago net loss of $2.1 million, or 15 cents per share, on sales of $8.1 million. Analysts were expecting net income of 5 cents per share and revenues of $15.9 million, Reuters reported.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Microtech Motion Sensor

Big breakthrough in microtechnology
Thursday, October 28, 2004
Winn L. Rosch
Special to The Plain Dealer
Although it's easy to lump all small things together, you will find big differences between microtechnology and nanotechnology. Certainly nanotechnology is smaller, dealing with particles measured in billionths of a meter, while microtechnology means things a thousand times larger.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Environmentalists Balk at Nanotech Initiative

Nanotech Group's Invitations Declined
Critics Say Effort Glosses Over Risks

By Rick Weiss
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, October 28, 2004; Page A04

A new effort by industry leaders and others to engender public trust in nanotechnology, the young science of making invisibly small materials, has run into difficulties on the eve of its first meeting after environmental and citizen groups declined to join for now because of doubts the initiative will serve the public interest.

None of the three invited representatives of environmental groups has agreed to join the newly created International Council on Nanotechnology at its inaugural meeting in Houston today.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Open-source software ready for government-wide adoption

Open-source software is ready for mainstream adoption in government, according to an office of government commerce report published today.

The conclusions drawn from pilot implementations of open-source software in a variety of government bodies earlier this year show that open-source software can create savings for the public sector, particularly in conjunction with server consolidation.

The report published by the OGC also said that open-source software is a viable desktop alternative without creating problems with interoperability.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Folding Wheelchair Developed by Several Milwaukee Schools

Folding Commode-Shower Wheelchair Can Dramatically Improve Lives
24 Oct 2004

A new folding, commode-shower wheelchair developed by Milwaukee and Tampa VA researchers, addresses a clear need of the more than 200,000 people with spinal cord injuries and other individuals with disabilities in the United States, most of whom require a special commode wheelchair for personal hygiene.

The wheelchair is the first commercial product collaboratively designed by researchers at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design (MIAD), the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Milwaukee, and Tampa, and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. It address the serious problems of injuries and falls posed by current commode-shower wheelchairs while adding esthetic design and function that can significantly improve the quality of life for these and other wheelchair-bound patients.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Probiotic Products in Europe

European panel raises bar for quality probiotics

27/10/2004 - A panel of European experts has for the first time drawn up guidelines for quality standards for probiotic products in a bid to improve the quality of the increasing numbers of supplements and probiotic foods on the market.

. . .

Other probiotic suppliers like DSM have focused on identifying strains with high stability as well as adding coatings to protect their bacteria from moisture during processing and storage. Rhodia Food, now owned by Danisco, has licensed a new bacterial stabilisation system from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US, based on technology originally developed to stabilise enzymes.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Patient Welfare in India

Legislation soon to address `patient safety' in research
P.T. Jyothi Datta

Mumbai, Oct. 27

WITH an accent on "patient safety", the Government is set to bring in a legislation to protect the "welfare of a subject" taking part in research of any sort.

The Biomedical Research on Human Subjects (Regulation, Control and Safeguards) Bill 2004 has been cleared by the Health Ministry and is currently being whetted by the Law Ministry. And if the going is smooth, the Centre hopes to introduce the Bill in the forthcoming winter session of Parliament, according to Dr Vasantha Muthuswamy, Senior Deputy Director-General, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR).

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

BioTerror Ethnic Weapons

Scientists warn of 'ethnic weapons'
By Leigh Dayton
October 27, 2004
BIOLOGICAL weapons that target selected ethnic groups could become part of the terrorists' arsenal unless governments and scientists act now, the British Medical Association warns.

Such designer weapons would be based on the growing ability of scientists to unravel and compare human DNA.

In theory, experts could engineer organisms to attack genetic variations commonly found in, say, Chinese or German populations.

Genetically engineered anthrax, smallpox and polio viruses are also "approaching reality", the BMA claims in a new report, Biotechnology, Weapons and Humanity II.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Third Wave's Third Quarter

Third Wave Reports Third-Quarter 2004 Financial Results


Continued clinical revenue growth and customer adoptions

MADISON, Wis., October 27, 2004 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Third Wave Technologies Inc. today reported financial results for the third quarter and nine months ended Sept. 30, 2004.

. . .

Mr. Puisis also has appointed Kevin T. Conroy, 39, formerly the company's vice president of legal affairs, as general counsel and secretary of Third Wave. Mr. Conroy brings to his new role extensive business and legal experience specializing in intellectual property, litigation and acquisitions. Prior to joining the company, Mr. Conroy worked for GE Healthcare, where he oversaw the development and management of its Information Technologies group intellectual property portfolio, and developed and executed litigation, licensing, and corporate and product acquisition legal strategies.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

State official says network of investors needed

State official says network of investors needed

Dinesh Ramde For the State Journal
October 27, 2004

A statewide network of angel investors would increase both the number of investments and the amount of money coming into local early-stage businesses, says Lorrie Keating Heinemann, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions.

On Tuesday, Heinemann reaffirmed the state's commitment to helping local entrepreneurs secure funding. She spoke to about 100 local businesspeople and investors at a meeting of the Wisconsin Innovation Network at the Sheraton Inn Madison.

Heinemann said DFI's goal is to build a network of angel investors in Wisconsin.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Alfalight Wins Laser Funding

Alfalight Wins Laser Funding

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MADISON, Wis. -- Alfalight, Inc., a technology innovator and manufacturer of highly efficient and reliable high-power diode lasers, today announced that it has received a research and development contract worth $3.8 million from the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. This 18-month research and development contract will enable Alfalight to develop a high-power multimode diode laser whose output wavelength will be highly stable against changes in temperature, drive current, and manufacturing variations.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

New Leader Takes the Helm at National Technology Transfer Center

New Leader Takes the Helm at National Technology Transfer Center
WHEELING, W.V., Oct. 26 (AScribe Newswire) -- James E. Goulka is the new Chief Executive Officer at the Robert C. Byrd National Technology Transfer Center.

Goulka comes to the NTTC from Scottsdale, Ariz., where he was president and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and president of both the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture and Taliesin Preservation, Inc., which is focused on preserving Wright's Wisconsin home. Prior to his affiliation with the Wright organizations, he was president and CEO of two technology companies based in his hometown of Chicago and in Minneapolis.

"The NTTC has a powerful mandate from its federal clients - NASA, the Mine Safety and Health Administration and the Missile Defense Agency," said Goulka. "My intention is to help the NTTC grow and to serve these clients and other potential clients in creative new ways."

Goulka sees the NTTC as an intermediary, bringing its federal clients together with private industry, academia and other federal agencies to share technologies that will advance the missions of its federal clients and result in new commercial products.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Stem cell group plans $20m float

Stem cell group plans $20m float
By Fleur Leyden
October 27, 2004

Page Tools
Email to a friend Printer format
A biotechnology company backed by Visy cardboard king Richard Pratt is aiming for a $20 million float to commercialise stem cell technology for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications.

Mesoblast plans to begin an investor roadshow shortly after Melbourne's spring racing carnival.

Its founder, stem cell scientist Silviu Itescu, is a biotechnology adviser to the Pratt family's Thorney Investments. He is the director of transplantation immunology at the Columbia and Cornell universities' NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

He has identified specific stem cells in adult human bone marrow that help to stimulate blood vessel growth in the heart, and developed a way of using the cells to prevent the death of heart cells and improve cardiac function after a heart attack.

It is believed an adult stem cell technology will have fewer regulatory and ethical hurdles to cross than embryonic stem cell-based techniques.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Software and IP

The software industry is undergoing a gradual transformation, and consumer fatigue is at its root. The licensing model that has formed the basis for the modern software industry is facing challenges on many fronts, and the industry is scrambling to keep its footing. Where this period of change may lead software producers and consumers isn't quite clear, but some trends are emerging. Since the proliferation of the internet, unauthorized redistribution of digital goods has become rampant. But although software sharing probably won't kill the software industry, the reasoning behind it shares some pedigree with the customer revolt that promises to transform the way software is sold.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Third Wave to Present at Rodman & Renshaw Conference

Third Wave to Present at Rodman & Renshaw Conference

MADISON, Wis., October 26, 2004 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Third Wave Technologies Inc. today announced that it will present a company update at the Rodman & Renshaw Techvest Healthcare Conference, which is being held Oct. 26-28, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. John J. Puisis, Third Wave's chief executive officer, will make the company's presentation on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2004, at 8 a.m. EDT.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Open Source in Space

U.S., International Space Organizations Turn to Open Source

NASA, international counterparts are relying on open-source operating systems, e-mail and other programs to manage terrestrial and orbital functions.

By Larry Greenemeier, InformationWeek
Oct. 26, 2004

Open source is reaching new heights as space organizations look to this communally developed software to power both terrestrial and orbital operations. Both the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organization, in particular, are using open-source software to build, guide, and repair critical satellite systems.

The use of open source is fairly widespread throughout NASA. Open source is being used is as the operating system of Project Columbia. SGI's Linux-based Altix system operates at the heart of Project Columbia, which consists of a 10,240-processor Space Exploration Simulator supercomputer built to help NASA scientists with space exploration, global warming research, and aerospace engineering.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Secure storage for Battlefield

ORLANDO, Fla., Storage Networking World, Oct. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Smartronix, Decru, Inc., and Network Appliance, Inc. today announced a secure storage solution designed for forward-deployed military environments. The Expeditionary Encrypted Data Store (EEDS) combines NetApp(R) storage systems with Decru DataFort(TM) storage security appliances in a ruggedized, portable case. EEDS delivers reliable, intuitive storage functionality paired with powerful security features to support a broad range of missions.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Convert Adult Human Stem Cells To Dopamine Neurons

Jefferson Scientists Find New Way To Convert Adult Human Stem Cells To Dopamine Neurons
Researchers at Jefferson Medical College have found a new way to coax bone marrow stem cells into becoming dopamine-producing neurons. If the method proves reliable, the work may ultimately lead to new therapies for neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease, which is marked by a loss of dopamine-making cells in the brain.

Developmental biologist Lorraine Iacovitti, Ph.D., associate director of the Farber Institute for Neurosciences at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and her co-workers had previously shown that by using a potion of growth factors and other nutrients in the laboratory, they were able to convert adult human bone marrow stem cells into adult brain cells. Human adult bone marrow stem cells – also known as pluripotent stem cells – normally give rise to human bone, muscle, cartilage and fat cells.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Fusion

Z’s $61.7 million refurbishment to advance fusion machine’s capabilities

The story continues for unusual accelerator

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Sandia National Laboratories’ Z machine, which last year emitted neutrons to enter the race to provide the world virtually unlimited electricity from, essentially, seawater, has received approval from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to proceed with a $61.7 million refurbishment. The project is called ZR, for Z-Refurbishment.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Speed vs. IP?

Summing Up: Does Speed Trump the Development of Intellectual Property?
October 25, 2004

by Jim Heskett

This month’s column, in the eyes of several respondents, represents the struggle of competitive strategies based on process versus product. When seen in this light, the triumph of speed over ideas, which many see as a reality, is not necessarily onerous. And it doesn’t, in the opinion of respondents, warrant additional regulatory intervention.

Paula Thornton asks, “Does it [the loss of intellectual property to rapid responders] really matter? ... In many cases IP is overutilized as a crutch (or as nail to those bearing hammers).” David Sherr recalls, “Lester Thurow introduced the idea of IP as not sustainable as a competitive advantage…. It is knowledge that allows speed to trump IP.”

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

First EU Biosimilar Filing

EU accepts BioPartner's interferon as first 'biosimilar' filing

25/10/2004 - Swiss biopharmaceuticals company BioPartners has filed its first application in Europe for a generic version of interferon alpha, a biological drug. If approved, the 'biosimilar' could be on the market as early as next year.

This development comes shortly after the US government turned down an application to market Omnitrop/Omnitrope (somatropin), a generic version of recombinant human growth hormone developed by Sandoz, citing problems in establishing an appropriate regulatory route for ‘biogeneric’ products.
Last year, the European Parliament approved new pharmaceutical legislation that, among other things, set out a legal framework for the registration of so-called ‘biosimilars’, biological therapies that are therapeutically the same as existing, approved biological products.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Questra and GE Healtcare Enter IP Licensing Deal

Questra Corporation Enters Into Broad Intellectual Property Agreement with GE Healthcare

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct. 25, 2004--Questra Corporation announced today that it has entered into an intellectual property assignment and license agreement with GE Healthcare that provides Questra with broad intellectual property coverage for its intelligent device management products. The terms of the agreement were not announced.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Intel Looks to Nanotechnology

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--For Intel, moving away from silicon is a matter of when, not if.

Chip manufacturers will continue to follow the evolutionary path described by Moore's Law for several more years, but engineers will have to substantially change the underlying design and ingredients of their products, said several Intel researchers Friday at a presentation at the company's headquarters here.


Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

European Patent Office continues to foster European innovation

European Patent Office continues to foster European innovation
24 Oct 2004

The European Patent Office's epoline® Annual Conference will take place in Salzburg, Austria, on 23-24 November 2004. This year's conference will highlight patents in the context of European innovation policy supporting the Lisbon process to make Europe the most competitive economy in the world by 2010. Intellectual property related to most aspects of information technology will be addressed within the Conference theme "IT meets IP - supporting innovation".

A well-developed patent culture is a key element in the knowledge society with a view to sustaining innovation and promoting economic growth. epoline®, the EPO's electronic business interface, facilitates access to the European patent granting procedure as well as the dissemination of technical knowledge divulged in patents across Europe and beyond.

The service also plays an increasing communication role in innovation networks where scientists meet business, creating a climate conducive to enhanced investment, innovation and entrepreneurship.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

TomoTherapy -- Treating Cancer Without Surgery

No-surgery cancer treatment

By SMILEY ANDERS
smiley@theadvocate.com
Advocate staff writer

The field of medical physics focuses on radiation technology and imaging equipment to detect cancers and treat them without surgery.
And Baton Rouge's Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center is investing in the personnel and equipment to make it one of the major players in the field.

. . .

"The TomoTherapy system promises to transform the future of cancer treatment," said Todd Stevens, president and CEO of Mary Bird Perkins. He said the cancer center "will be part of an exclusive network of treatment centers conducting research to explore TomoTherapy's full capabilities."

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Energy Saving Buildings

High tech buildings use sunlight, sea water to save energy

ELLEN SIMON
Associated Press

At Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, the lights are controlled by sensors that measure sunlight. They dim immediately when it's sunny and brighten when a passing cloud blocks the sun.

At a new middle school in Washington, D.C., the air conditioner shuts off when a window is open.

A wall of windows at a University of Pennsylvania engineering building has built-in blinds adjusted by a computer program that tracks the sun's path.

Buildings are getting smarter - and the next generation of building materials is expected to do even more.

Windows could trap the sun's energy to heat hot water. Sensors that measure the carbon dioxide exhaled by people in a room could determine whether the air conditioning needs to be turned up.

"More potential products have been invented in the last 15 years than in the entire prior history of architecture," says Philadelphia architect Stephen Kieran. "We're only beginning to tap the potential of those materials."

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Reducing Herbicides

Herbicide Helper

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a chemical that could help farmers cut down on the hundreds of millions of kilograms of herbicide they spray on their fields each year.

. . .

The university has licensed the technology to Entercel, a startup that aims, via partnership with an agricultural chemical company, to have a combination herbicide and booster product on the market within five years.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Dispute may change patent system

Dispute may change patent system
Boulder lawyers involved in legal tussle with broad implications

By Matt Branaugh, Camera Business Writer
October 24, 2004

A patent lawsuit involving a Colorado man, a Virginia company and a half-dozen Boulder-area lawyers could change the way patents are written, interpreted and protected in the United States.

The 7-year-old case between Edward Phillips and AWH Corp. has traversed the federal district and appeals court levels and now is heading to a rare, important hearing with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

The hearing is not expected to land on the court's calendar until later this year or early next year. But a broad collection of interests, both nationally and internationally, already are aligning and closely watching the case.

"It is probably the most important issue being addressed today in the patent field," says Donald Dunner, a Washington, D.C.-based attorney and member of the American Bar Association.

Last month, at least 20 parties, including the ABA, filed "friend-of-the-court" briefs that don't support one side or the other, but weigh in on how the legal questions raised should be answered. The Federal Trade Commission, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and such companies as Microsoft Corp., IBM Corp. and Google Inc., were among those voicing their opinions.

Full story.

Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.