Syngenta to Appeal Patent Verdict
Google wins in trademark lawsuit

How Stem Cells Repair a Heart

Researchers Describe How Human Blood Stem Cells Transform Themselves to Repair Injured Animal Hearts
M. D. Anderson News Release 12/15/04

Regeneration of damaged hearts using blood stem cells now appears to be clinically promising, say Texas researchers who show that in mice, human stem cells use different methods to morph into two kinds of cells needed to restore heart function ¯ cardiac muscle cells that contract the heart as well as the endothelial cells that line blood vessels found throughout the organ.

Using a sophisticated way of examining the “humanness” of mouse heart cells, researchers report in the December 21 issue of the journal Circulation (which was published online December 13) that two months after mice with ailing hearts were treated with human stem cells, about two percent of cells in their heart showed evidence of a human genetic marker.

Furthermore, researchers described, for the first time, how these human master cells use different ways to become two distinct kinds of cells needed in the heart. Human stem cells primarily “fuse” onto mouse cardiac cells to produce new muscle (myocyte) cells that have both human and mouse DNA. But to form new blood vessel cells, they “differentiate” or mature by themselves, presumably to patch damaged mouse blood vessels with human cells.

Full story.


Please visit our sponsor Gehrke & Associates, SC to learn more about how to enhance and defend your intellectual property.  Thank you.

Comments