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Neurognostics Elects New Board Member

Neurognostics Elects New Board Member

Milwaukee, WI, August 29, 2005 – Neurognostics, Inc., the leader in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) products and services, is pleased to announce the election of Milton Silva-Craig to its Board of Directors. Mr. Silva-Craig will begin his service as a Board Director as of the next regularly scheduled Board meeting.

Mr. Silva-Craig is the President and Chief Operating Officer of Emageon Inc., (NASDAQ: EMAG). Mr. Silva-Craig joined Emageon in March, 2001 as its COO. Emageon provides enterprise-based, medical image management software and services. Prior to joining Emageon, Mr. Silva-Craig held key leadership positions in marketing and sales, business development, product development and operations during his eight years at General Electric Medical Systems, a leading provider of medical diagnostic imaging equipment and information technologies. Mr. Silva-Craig holds a BA in International Relations, an MBA in International Business and Marketing, and a JD in Corporate Law from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

"Milton has a tremendous track record in the field of medical imaging, both in a multi-national setting and most recently with a successful start-up organization. His experience, knowledge and demonstrated success in the field are great assets. I'm excited at the prospect of working with him and certain that he will be able to make significant contributions to the company’s success," said Jeff Rusinow, Neurognostics’ Board Chairman.

Founded in 2003, Neurognostics strives to enhance the quality of life for millions of patients suffering from disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) by developing, validating, and implementing applications that release the clinical power of fMRI. fMRI is a powerful imaging technique that extends the capability of Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging by providing information about the functioning of imaged tissue. The Company strives to develop applications that will become the standard technique to assess and manage patients suffering from a variety of CNS disorders.

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Move to Emphasize Nanotech in Madison Over Biotech

Getting the state to see the light
00:00 am 8/29/05
JASON STEIN jstein@madison.com 608-252-6154

To see the economic power of nanotechnology, the science of the small, walk down a humdrum hallway on the third-floor of UW-Madison's Engineering Hall.

The green floors and white- tiled walls look more like a middle school than a money- maker, but don't be fooled. A row of four engineers' offices holds the co-founders of two hot startup companies and the directors of two campus research centers with millions in federal money.

Yet no state officials have walked this hall to learn about nanotech's potential of engineering products from the atoms up, said Juan de Pablo, a chemical engineer in office No. 2 and head of the university's Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

"I think the Legislature is placing a lot of emphasis on biotechnology," said de Pablo, whose center has drawn about $12 million in federal money for its innovative research and is in the running for an additional $18 million grant to be announced next month. "But (nanotechnology) has an equal if not more impressive list of successes, and it's not on their radar screen."

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Building starts on space for Promega

Building starts on space for Promega
00:00 am 8/25/05
MARV BALOUSEK mbalousek@madison.com

Construction began Wednesday on a three-building office and retail project in the Fitchburg Center that will provide additional space for Promega Corp.

The $22 million, 84,000-square-foot project near Cheryl Parkway and Fish Hatchery Road will contain 62,000 square feet occupied by Promega and 22,000 square feet of retail space.

Promega aims to add more than 100 employees over the next five years and the company plans to expand its manufacturing and research space.

"This expansion by Promega promises to be a signature project within Fitchburg Center," said Mayor Tom Clauder in a statement. "This development accomplishes our economic development objectives by assisting one of our major employers to expand."

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Legislature to mull cloning ban; scientists outraged

Legislature to mull cloning ban; scientists outraged

By Todd Richmond
Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. - Anyone caught cloning a human being in Wisconsin could face up to a decade in prison and a million dollars in forfeitures under a Republican bill that outraged stem cell scientists fear could handcuff their work in the state.

The measure would ban cloning to create babies. It also would outlaw so-called therapeutic cloning, a term for cloning human embryos for research such as extracting stem cells. Embryos are destroyed after taking out the cells.

The bill also would ban a practice called parthenogenesis, in which a female egg cell is stimulated to divide without fertilizing it.

The Senate Judiciary, Corrections and Privacy Committee and the Assembly Committee on Children and Families are scheduled to hear comments on identical versions of the bill in both houses during a hearing Monday. The meeting promises to pit supporters of stem cell research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison against conservative lawmakers and right-to-life lobbyists.

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Lloyds offers relief for Linux-patent concerns

Lloyds offers relief for Linux-patent concerns
Offer might attract firms fearing legal action

Roger Howorth, IT Week 18 Aug 2005

Lloyd's of London is to offer insurance to protect firms if patent actions arise from their use of Linux and open-source software.

The offer may attract firms that would not be able to afford the costs of a legal action for patent infringement. Experts estimate that the cost of defending a typical patent case in the US is $3m.

The policy from Lloyd's will be offered in conjunction with software insurance specialist Open Source Risk Management (OSRM), which already offers similar policies and says it will charge firms $60 (£35) per server.

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Burns victims healed with foetal skin cells

Burns victims healed with foetal skin cells
Children suffering from burns injuries have been healed using skin samples grown from the cells of a miscarried foetus, say Swiss researchers.

They said the groundbreaking procedure, which was carried out at Lausanne University Hospital, offered the hope of rapid and complication-free treatment.

The study, which was published in the medical journal m>The Lancetm>, reported that a bank of foetal skin cells was developed from a single donation of foetal skin. The mother, who had miscarried after 14 weeks of pregnancy, had consented to the donation, it said.

The eight children, who had a combination of second- and third-degree burns, were treated as outpatients and the healing process took just two weeks. The skin samples were placed on the lesions, which were then bandaged.

Led by Patrick Hohlfeld, the medical team found that several million skin samples could be constructed from just one donation of foetal skin.

"Normally, these children would have needed skin grafts, but thanks to the very favourable conditions created by contact with the foetal skin, their skin regenerated rapidly itself," Hohlfeld told swissinfo.

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Scientists reprogram skin cells as stem cells

Scientists reprogram skin cells as stem cells
New lab technique doesn't use human eggs, embryos
By RICK WEISS
Washington Post
Posted: Aug. 21, 2005

Washington - Scientists for the first time have turned ordinary skin cells into what appear to be embryonic stem cells - without having to use human eggs or make new human embryos in the process, as has previously been required, a Harvard research team announced Sunday.

The new technique uses laboratory-grown human embryonic stem cells - such as the ones President Bush has already approved for use by federally funded researchers - to "reprogram" the genes in a person's skin cell, turning that skin cell into an embryonic stem cell itself.

Moreover, since the new stem cells made this way are essentially rejuvenated versions of a person's own skin cells, the DNA in those new stem cells matches the DNA of the person who provided the skin cells. In theory at least, that means that any tissues grown from those newly minted stem cells could be transplanted into the person to treat a disease without much risk that they would be rejected, since they would constitute an exact genetic match.


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Scientists Mess with the Speed of Light

Scientists Mess with the Speed of Light
By Ker Than
LiveScience Staff Writer
posted: 19 August, 2005
3:41 pm ET

Researchers in Switzerland have succeeded in breaking the cosmic speed limit by getting light to go faster than, well, light.

Or is it all an illusion?

Scientists have recently succeeded in doing all sorts of fancy things with light, including slowing it down and even stopping it all together. Now a team at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland is controlling the speed of light using simple off-the-shelf optical fibers, without the aid of special media such as cold gases or crystalline solids like in other experiments.

“This has the enormous advantage of being a simple, inexpensive procedure that works at any wavelength,” said Luc Thévenaz, lead author of the study detailing the research.

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Spammer Receives 15-Month Sentence

Spammer Receives 15-Month Sentence
Engineer Stole, Sold AOL Screen Names

By Jonathan Krim
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, August 18, 2005; Page D05

A former America Online Inc. engineer was sentenced yesterday to 15 months in prison for stealing the company's entire subscriber list, which was used to send hundreds of millions of spam e-mails to AOL members.

Jason Smathers of Harpers Ferry, W.Va., pleaded guilty in February to using another America Online employee's ID to break into the company's database and steal 92 million screen names used by the Dulles Internet company's nearly 30 million subscribers.

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Wisconsin sees growth in new high-tech firms

Maverick leaders defy risks of failure to lead state's budding businesses
Wisconsin sees growth in new high-tech firms

By KATHLEEN GALLAGHER
kgallagher@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Aug. 13, 2005

Born and bred in Silicon Valley, Tim Stultz graduated from Stanford University, worked at California-based companies and had never even been to Wisconsin.

After earning his doctorate in biochemistry at the University of Manchester, British-born Trevor Twose was involved with a handful of biotech companies in the United Kingdom and on the U.S. coasts, including one of the early leaders in DNA fingerprinting.

A Burlington native who majored in business at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Frank Langley asked a recruiter 20 years ago to help him move from his job at a large medical device company to a much smaller concern.

These three men come from very different places, but they have one thing in common: They're among a growing list of top executives who want to build value at young Wisconsin high-tech companies.

In the last few years, the number of technology-based start-ups in the state has grown rapidly, creating opportunities for leaders who want the thrill of building a company despite the risk that nearly 6 of 10 new businesses fail.

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Crop king Monsanto seeks pig-breeding patent clout

Crop king Monsanto seeks pig-breeding patent clout

By Carey Gillam
Reuters
Thursday, August 11, 2005; 8:07 AM

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (Reuters) - Monsanto Co., already a world powerhouse in biotech crops, is shaking up the swine industry with plans to patent pig-breeding techniques and lay claim to the animals born as a result.

Agricultural experts are scrambling to assess how these patents might affect the market, while consumer activists warn that if the company is granted pig-related patents, on top of its tight rein on key feed and food crops, its control over agriculture could be unprecedented.

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Open-source allies go on patent offensive

Open-source allies go on patent offensive
By Stephen Shankland, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: August 11, 2005, 4:00 AM PT

SAN FRANCISCO--Two Linux allies are taking a leaf out of their opponents' book as they try to prevent software patents from putting a crimp in open source.

Red Hat will finance outside programmers' efforts to obtain patents that may be used freely by open-source developers, the top Linux seller said Tuesday at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo here. At the same time, the Open Source Developer Labs launched a patent commons project, which will provide a central list of patents that have been donated to the collaborative programming community.

The threat of patent-infringement lawsuits has long dogged collaborative development, leading some open-source programming advocates to turn against the patent system altogether. The initiatives signal a new willingness on the part of the open-source community to combat the threat of patent-infringement lawsuits more directly--and within the existing patent system.

"We're watching a groundswell of alternative ideas coming forward to try to counteract some of the patent terrorism that's coming up in industry," Steve Mills, general manager of IBM's software group, said in an interview.

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Researchers Take ‘Fantastic Voyage’ Through the Human Body

Researchers Take ‘Fantastic Voyage’ Through the Human Body
RIT showcases landmark medical imaging project

Using revolutionary medical imaging technology, researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are providing a better understanding of the human body and its many secrets.

Led by Richard Doolittle, RIT’s director of the department of medical sciences, and Paul Craig, professor of chemistry, a team of students has created never-before-seen virtual images of the pancreas, detailed pictures of the human skull and DNA-level images of protein molecules. Their findings were presented today in a virtual tour entitled “3D Visualization in Science, from molecules to cells to organs.”

“We are now able to create virtual images of the human body at the microscopic level,” Doolittle notes. “These images have never been produced before and will help us better understand human development while also having tremendous implications for the diagnosis and treatment of numerous diseases.”

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Wisconsin attempting to lure MN startup

Wisconsin attempting to lure MN startup
Mark Reilly
Staff writer

Biotech startup Excorp Medical Inc., which recently moved to Minneapolis, now might move on to Madison, Wis., a possible setback to Minnesota's efforts to build the sector.

Excorp, which is developing a bioartificial liver system, is pursuing a "competitive" proposal from Wisconsin to establish production facilities in that state. It could wind up putting its headquarters and other administrative facilities there as well. In total, those operations could employ 200 people in the next few years, if Excorp's plans go well.

CEO Dan Miller said the company isn't turning its back on the Twin Cities. It plans to keep its research and technology operations in Minneapolis' biotech zone, where it has a 10-year lease and expects to employ 20 people or so by year's end.

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Enhancing the anti-cancer properties of a digitalis

UW-MADISON SCIENTISTS ZERO IN ON DRUGS' SWEET SPOTS

MADISON - Employing a simple new technique to manipulate the sugars that power many front-line drugs, a team of Wisconsin scientists has , a drug commonly used to treat heart disease.

Reporting the work in the Aug. 8 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of pharmaceutical sciences Jon S. Thorson, describes a series of experiments that boosted the cell-killing potency and tumor specificity of the drug, derived from the foxglove plant and used to stimulate the heart. The drug is suspected to have anti-cancer properties, but its use to treat cancer has been little explored.

The new work is important because it provides scientists and drug companies with a quick and easy way to manipulate the sugars found in chemicals produced in nature. Such chemicals - often found in microbes, plants and marine organisms - are the bedrock agents upon which many leading drugs are built. The ways sugar groups are organized on a molecule often dictate the agent's biological effects.

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Controversial Intellectual Property Rights Bill Stalls in Congress

Controversial Intellectual Property Rights Bill Stalls in Congress
U.S. Newswire
08/01/2005

WASHINGTON, Aug. 1 /U.S. Newswire/ -- An intellectual property rights bill that was expected by many earlier this year to easily glide through Congress has stalled. Since the Patent Reform Act (HR 2795) has failed to meet expectations, a handful of the bill's early supporters are suggesting the bill die in committee.

Authored by Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), the chairman of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, the bill has had the opposite effect than members of Congress had originally intended. When the bill was introduced on June 8 it was heralded by Rep. Smith as a silver bullet, designed to enhance the nation's patent system. Opponents of the controversial bill argued the bill would dull America's intellectual edge, disadvantage the nation's small businesses, cost Americans jobs and stifle individual ingenuity.

"Behind closed doors, businesses, small and large are fighting tooth and nail to either gut or kill this controversial bill," said Ron Riley, president of the Professional Inventors Alliance. "Many industries directly or indirectly affected by patents, such as high- tech, pharmaceuticals, bio-tech and independent inventors would rather see the legislation die on the vine or heavily gutted."

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Vatican: Refusing vaccines must be weighed against health threats

Vatican: Refusing vaccines must be weighed against health threats

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By Carol Glatz

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The Vatican urged parents to use caution when deciding not to inoculate their children against infectious diseases when so-called "ethical vaccines" are not yet available.

In a paper, the Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life reaffirmed a person's right to abstain from receiving vaccines that were prepared from cells derived from aborted fetuses, but it said such a choice must be made after carefully considering whether refusing the vaccination would pose serious health risks to the child and the larger public.

"We are responsible for all people, not just ourselves," Msgr. Jacques Suaudeau, a medical doctor and official at the Pontifical Academy for Life, told Catholic News Service.

"If it is a question of protecting the whole population and avoiding death and malformation in others, that is more important" than abstaining from vaccines developed from abortions that might have occurred decades ago, he said.

The academy's paper, "Moral Reflections on Vaccines Prepared From Cells Derived From Aborted Human Fetuses," was based on a study of the issue resulting from a request by a Largo, Fla.-based pro-life group, Children of God for Life. In June 2003 the group asked the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith for a formal statement on the church's position concerning the morality of using vaccines associated with human tissue coming from abortions.

The doctrinal congregation approved of the academy's findings, which were published in Italian in the May/June edition of Medicina e Morale (Medicine and Morals), a journal put out by the bioethics institute at Rome's Sacred Heart University.

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