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October 2005
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The nose cells that may help the paralysed walk again

The nose cells that may help the paralysed walk again

Surgeons in London to try revolutionary stem cell technique on crash victims

Sarah Boseley, health editor
Wednesday November 30, 2005
The Guardian

Surgeons will attempt early next year to mend the severed nerves of young people who have suffered motorbike accidents in the first trial of a simple but potentially revolutionary technology that could one day allow the paralysed to walk again.

At least ten operations will be carried out to test in humans a technique pioneered in animals by the neuroscientist Geoffrey Raisman, who heads the spinal repair unit of University College, London. He discovered 20 years ago that cells from the lining of the nose constantly regenerate themselves. Professor Raisman's team believes that if those cells were implanted at the site of the damage they would build a bridge across the break, allowing the nerve fibres to knit back together.

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South Korean scandal brings worries in stem cell projects

South Korean scandal brings worries in stem cell projects
By Dan Vergano and Cathy Lynn Grossman, USA TODAY

Embryonic stem cell researchers are worried about the future of international cooperation in their field after a prominent scientist's surprise resignation from a fledgling stem-cell-sharing effort.

On Thanksgiving, South Korean scientist Woo-suk Hwang of Seoul National University resigned as head of the World Stem Cell Hub, a nascent international embryonic stem cell research effort he started. In 2004, Hwang's team was the first to clone human embryonic stem cells, master cells from which specific kinds of tissue arise.

Since then, Hwang's team has become the world's leader in stem cell research. This year, it unveiled 11 more cloned stem cell lines, and it cloned a dog.

But a team member, the University of Pittsburgh's Gerald Schatten, resigned this month. He warned of ethical breaches involving junior lab members inappropriately donating eggs for research.

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Researchers praise NimbleGen's technology as good, efficient

Start-up makes pitch to scientists
Researchers praise NimbleGen's technology as good, efficient
By KATHLEEN GALLAGHER
kgallagher@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Nov. 28, 2005

When you've got a better test for genetic researchers, you don't sell it by putting an ad in a magazine.

NimbleGen Systems Inc., a 6-year-old company spun out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed a gene chip that is used to identify how genes work. Management and the company's investors say these gene chips have the potential to revolutionize genetic research.

They just need to convince everyone else.

That's where scientific collaboration comes in.

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Stem-cell vision far from reality

Stem-cell vision far from reality

By Steve Johnson

Mercury News


The $3 billion stem-cell initiative California voters approved one year ago this month triggered proposals to finance similar research in at least 10 other states.

Yet so far, stem-cell scientists, companies and their supporters have little to cheer about.

California's program, which was designed to get around severe federal limits on such research, has been bottled up by two lawsuits. And because of a national stem-cell backlash, only two states -- Connecticut and Illinois -- allocated money for stem-cell studies this year, according to the National Conference of State Legislators.

Worse for stem-cell advocates, several states -- including South Dakota, Arizona and Nebraska -- passed laws this year limiting stem-cell research. In other states, the issue sparked nasty battles likely to rage into next year's legislative session.

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Cloning pioneer quits in disgrace over ethics breach

Cloning pioneer quits in disgrace over ethics breach
By Deborah Cameron in Tokyo and Deborah Smith Science Editor
November 25, 2005

tOne of the world's leading stem cell and cloning scientists resigned in disgrace yesterday, saying that he had to "tell the public words that are too shameful and horrible".

Hwang Woo-suk, of Seoul National University, said female scientists working at his lab donated their own eggs for experiments, a serious ethical breach.

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Stem cell researchers paid women for ova

Stem cell researchers paid women for ova
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Big News Network.com Tuesday 22nd November, 2005 (UPI)

Medical researchers working with South Korean stem cell pioneer Professor Hwang Woo-suk admit paying women to donate their ova for stem cell research.

Twenty South Korean donors received about $1,500 in 2002 and 2003 as compensation for donating ova, the Chosun Ilbo reported.

Although compensating donors is not illegal under a 2005 bioethics law, the revelation will likely add fuel to ethical concerns over the donation for Hwang's project that led to a public rift with a U.S. collaborator.

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Neurognostics Recognized for the “Minnies” Award

Neurognostics Recognized for the “Minnies” Award

Milwaukee, WI, November 21, 2005 – Neurognostics, Inc., a Wisconsin company specializing in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) products and services, was nominated for the 2005 edition of the Minnies, AuntMinnie.com's campaign to recognize excellence in radiology.

AuntMinnie.com is an Internet -based community for radiologists and related professionals in the medical imaging industry. The site provides a forum for academic and private practice radiologists, business managers, technologists and their industry counterparts to meet, collaborate and transact business.

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'Stem cell hub' cloning network project folding

'Stem cell hub' cloning network project folding
By CARL T. HALL
November 14, 2005

A global consortium designed to pursue a controversial type of stem cell research involving cloned embryos is collapsing amid ethical questions surrounding human egg donations in South Korea.

Pacific Fertility Center, an in-vitro fertilization clinic in San Francisco that was planning to be part of the consortium, says it is pulling out after the withdrawal Friday of the South Korea-based cloning network's primary U.S. organizer, Gerald Schatten of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

The collapse is a setback for advocates of creating "disease-specific" lines of stem cells, which involves insertion of DNA from patients into human eggs whose own DNA is first removed, a cloning technique known as "somatic cell nuclear transfer." Researchers say disease-specific cell lines can be powerful tools for studying the origins of genetic disease and finding new drugs to cure them.

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Plastic diode could lead to flexible, low power computer circuits, memory

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State University researchers have invented a new organic polymer tunnel diode – an electronic component that could one day lead to plastic computer memory and plastic logic circuits on computer chips. Today, computer chips use mainly inorganic silicon.

The diode transmits electrical current at room temperature, and its design lends itself to easy, inexpensive manufacturing for smart cards and other memory devices, said Paul Berger, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and professor of physics at Ohio State.

In tests, the team was able to fashion two diodes into a simple computer chip device called a logic switch, which was powered by the voltage equivalent to an ordinary watch battery.

Berger and his students describe their patent-pending invention in the current issue of the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters.

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Sperm stem cells closer to being like embryonic stem cells

DALLAS – Nov. 15, 2005 – New experiments that prevented rat sperm stem cells from changing permanently into sperm have brought researchers one step closer to coaxing such cells to behave like embryonic stem cells, capable of growing into many other types of cells in the body.
Researchers at the Cecil H. and Ida Green Center for Reproductive Biology Sciences at UT Southwestern Medical Center devised methods to keep male rat germ-line stem cells – sperm precursor cells – from differentiating, or changing, into sperm proper. The researchers also froze the sperm stem cells, thawed them, and transplanted them back into rat testes, where they developed into normal sperm.

Dr. David Garbers, professor of pharmacology, director of the Green Center and senior author of a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said the new work has many potential applications, including a possible alternative to embryonic stem cells, the development of new male contraceptives and new animal models to test stem cell-based therapies. Germ-line cells are those such as egg and sperm and their precursors whose genetic material can be passed to offspring.

"The ability to manipulate male germ-line stem cells and get them to grow and self-renew is a major step," said Dr. Garbers, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern.

"We're only one step removed from another major step, the Holy Grail for us certainly, which is pushing these cells back a level to a state that is pluripotent-like, similar to embryonic stem cells. That's what we're focused on now."

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Statins may simulate stem cells for heart repair

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- The drug pravastatin, which is used widely to decrease high cholesterol, may provide a previously unknown cardiovascular benefit in addition to lowering lipids.
Researchers at the University at Buffalo have found that pravastatin, the generic name of one of the statins currently prescribed to lower cholesterol, increased the concentration of endogenous stem cells that may participate in cardiac repair independent of any cholesterol-lowering action.

They also found that high doses of pravastatin improved cardiac function and coronary blood flow in an animal model in which flow had been artificially restricted, creating a condition known as hibernating myocardium. In this condition, heart cells reduce their function and oxygen needs and become dormant in response to insufficient blood flow.

Results of the study were presented today (Nov. 16, 2005) at the American Heart Association's 2005 Scientific Sessions in Dallas, Texas. "It is well known that stem cells have the potential to regenerate organs," said Gen Suzuki, M.D., Ph.D., research assistant professor in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and first author on the study.

"In the field of cardiology, adult stem cells isolated from bone marrow currently are being used to repair damaged heart tissue," Suzuki said. "Many animal and early clinical studies using this source of stem cells are ongoing right now."

Earlier reports have shown that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, known as statins, increased the number of circulating bone-marrow-derived or hematopoietic stem cells in blood, Suzuki said, but most work has focused on their effects in improving blood flow. Their localization in the heart or ability to increase cardiac-muscle-cell numbers has never been studied, he said.

The UB study employs a unique swine model of hibernating myocardium created by scientists in UB's Center for Research in Cardiovascular Medicine. Researchers treated normal pigs and pigs with hibernating myocardium with pravastatin for four weeks, and compared the results with normal pigs and pigs with hibernating myocardium that did not receive the statin.

Continue reading "Statins may simulate stem cells for heart repair" »

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Virgin Airways boss eyes plants for fleet fuel

Virgin Airways boss eyes plants for fleet fuel
Branson: ‘I believe it’s the future’ and can replace fossil fuel in 30 years

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Tired of skyrocketing jet fuel prices, Virgin Atlantic Airways boss Richard Branson said on Wednesday he plans to turn his back on hydrocarbons and use plant waste to power his fleet.

“We are looking for alternative fuel sources. We are going to start building cellulosic ethanol plants (to make) fuel that is derived from the waste product of the plant,” he told Reuters in an interview in the oil-rich United Arab Emirates.

“It is 100 percent environmentally friendly and I believe it’s the future of fuel, and over the next 20 or 30 years I think it actually will replace the conventional fuel that you get out of the ground.”


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A tech center boosting the Racine-area economy by reviving unused patents

Awakening dormant ideas
A tech center boosting the Racine-area economy by reviving unused patents
By KATHLEEN GALLAGHER
kgallagher@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Nov. 14, 2005

A Racine County organization that tries to bring to life mothballed patents to help the region's economy expand will be networking at an innovation conference in Calgary this week at the invitation of the Canadian Consulate General's office.

The organization - almost unknown in its home state - has been finding ways to turn unused private industry technology into companies or licensing revenue for the last two years.

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Motorcycle of the future will run on fuel cells, create no emissions

A hot hydrogen ride
Motorcycle of the future will run on fuel cells, create no emissions
By RICK BARRETT
rbarrett@journalsentinel.com
Last Updated: Nov. 13, 2005

It does not sound like a Harley, but a new motorcycle coming out soon could run on soybeans or ethanol.

Except for a little heat and some drinkable water, the ENV bike produces no emissions, says Intelligent Energy, a British company that recently opened an office in California to launch its hydrogen fuel-cell bike in the United States.

The ENV gets its name from being an "emissions-neutral vehicle." It can run on hydrogen stripped from bio fuels - anything from sunflower oil to soybeans. A single, 5-ounce canister of hydrogen will power the bike up to 100 miles, and it has a top speed of 50 mph.

"The acceleration between 0 and 30 miles per hour is very brisk. It's well-suited for urban use," said Andy Eggleston, ENV project director.

The first ENV motorcycles are expected to be available in the U.S. and United Kingdom in 2007 for $6,000 to $8,000.

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Lenders are starting to fill technology niche

Lenders are starting to fill technology niche
00:00 am 11/12/05
JASON STEIN jstein@madison.com

Pity Deven McGlenn when he goes to see bankers.

McGlenn is the chief executive officer of NeoClone, a promising Madison biotech company with a cheaper, faster way to produce proteins that can diagnose diseases and perhaps one day even treat them.

But before he can ask for a loan, McGlenn has a lot of explaining to do - such as, just what is a monoclonal antibody? And why should a bank take a risk on NeoClone, which expects to be losing money for at least another year?

So it's a surprising and promising sign for the local economy that some bankers are looking to lend to companies like NeoClone. From a Silicon Valley bank to a debt fund that loans out money from area banks, lenders are stepping up alongside traditional investors to fill tech companies' need for capital and help them create the jobs of the future in Madison.

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Supreme Court poised to take up patent law reform

Supreme Court poised to take up patent law reform
Financial Times

Updated: 9:13 p.m. ET Nov. 10, 2005
The US Supreme Court may be about to rewrite some of the most fundamental rules of innovation in America, as it considers a handful of cases that could change the course of US intellectual property law and undermine the value of patents owned by domestic and foreign companies.

Congress has been struggling for months to write a new law that would reform the country's patent system, which has been criticised for granting too many, often poor-quality, patents, and for encouraging ruinously costly litigation.

But legislative attempts at reform appear to have foundered, so attention has turned to the Supreme Court to create a better balance between competition and innovation.

The court has three cases before it and a fourth that could arrive soon, which test some of the most fundamental tenets of US patent jurisprudence. Which country's courts should decide patent disputes that cross borders?

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Alleged Virus Spreader Held Without Bond

Alleged Virus Spreader Held Without Bond

The Associated Press
Wednesday, November 9, 2005; 8:00 AM

LOS ANGELES -- A man has been ordered held without bond on charges of spreading electronic viruses so he could gain control over military and other computers and sell access to hackers and spammers.

Authorities in California say Jeanson James Ancheta, 20, also downloaded adware programs onto some 400,000 of the infected computers, or "botnets," in order to profit from the placements.

Ancheta, who was arrested last week, pleaded not guilty Monday in federal court. Trial was set for Dec. 27.

Prosecutors say his programs were powerful enough to infect computers operated by the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center in China Lake and the Defense Information Systems Agency, part of the U.S. Defense Department.

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Effort to Consolidate WI Tech Investing Efforts

She's banking on an angel
00:00 am 11/09/05
JASON STEIN jstein@madison.com

It's a vexing problem for Wisconsin's economy: Researchers at UW-Madison turn out top technology, in fields ranging from stem cells to electronics, but entrepreneurs often have trouble finding the money to take those innovations to market.

But a new effort to organize angels, wealthy investors in early-stage technology companies, is providing some answers to that conundrum, said Lorrie Keating Heinemann, the state's top banking and securities regulator.

Keating Heinemann, secretary of the state Department of Financial Institutions since 2003, has teamed her agency up with the state Department of Commerce and the Wisconsin Technology Council to form the Wisconsin Angel Network, which aims to connect scattered groups of investors from around the state.

"We would talk to some angel investors that had a large amount of deals and not enough capacity to fund all the deals, and we talked to other angel networks who were up and running for years and never really found any deals they wanted to invest in," she said.

So far, the network has brought together member groups representing more than 200 angel investors and created a confidential Web site, which came on line in June, where entrepreneurs have posted several dozen summaries of businesses seeking investment.

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Technology Campus breaks ground on a second building

Technology Campus breaks ground on a second building
00:00 am 11/09/05
JASON STEIN jstein@madison.com

The Fitchburg Technology Campus has broken ground on this $8 million, 6,000-square-foot building that will be the second stage of its New Venture Center, which will include two nanotech firms among its tenants - Imago Scientific Instruments and Platypus Technologies.

The Fitchburg Technology Campus has broken ground on a second building to house early stage companies that will have Imago Scientific Instruments as its anchor tenant - the second local nanotechnology company to move onto the campus.

The fast-growing Imago Scientific has won national attention for a microscope that can provide 3-D images down to the level of individual atoms. Chris Armstrong, a real estate developer working with the Technology Campus, said the recently completely first building in the campus' New Venture Center is already filled and includes Platypus Technologies, another nanotech company that is developing devices to detect the presence of pesticides and other toxins.

"We're excited about Imago, especially coming on the heels of Platypus," Armstrong said of the announcement. "We're building a cluster of nanotech companies here."

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South Korea: Fertility Doctor Denies Illegal Ova in Stem Cell Research

Fertility Doctor Denies Illegal Ova in Stem Cell Research

The head of a fertility clinic being investigated for involvement in the trade in human egg cells on Tuesday denied supplying illegally harvested ova to stem cell pioneer Prof. Hwang Woo-suk. Roh Sung-il, the head of the clinic at Mizmedi Women’s Hospital in Seoul, said the eggs were acquired legally and with the donors’ consent but would not say how many ova he provided to Hwang.
Roh said police had taken all relevant documents and he was sure there would be no further problems. The doctor has been involved in stem cell research with Hwang since 1995 and received a medal from the government for his contribution to the field in 2004.

Asked about charges that the clinic conducted in-vitro fertilization on patients who it knew had obtained the eggs illegally, Roh said he did not know whether patients bought ova outside the hospital. “A doctor is not an investigator,” he said. He denied violating the Medical Service Act or the Bioethics Law in the process of conducting operations. However, he said he was in principle aware that it is possible to obtain egg cells illegally.

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Doyle vetoes ban on human cloning

Doyle vetoes ban on human cloning
Governor says bill would have limited stem cell research
By STACY FORSTER
sforster@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Nov. 4, 2005

Madison - Saying the state shouldn't stand in the way of stem cell research in Wisconsin, Gov. Jim Doyle on Thursday vetoed a ban on all forms of human cloning in the state.

Supporters of the ban said it would have prevented unethical research from being conducted here.

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Nobel Prize winner heats up physics with 'stone cold science'

Nobel Prize winner heats up physics with 'stone cold science'
Posted: Nov. 2, 2005

Eric Cornell won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 after proving the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation with Carl Wieman and Wolfgang Ketterle. In the 1920s Satyendra Nath Bose and Albert Einstein developed the theory, which predicts the behavior of identical atoms. Cornell spoke recently at Marquette University on "Stone Cold Science: Bose-Einstein Condensation and the Weird World of Physics a Millionth of a Degree Above Absolute Zero." Cornell is a professor of physics at JILA, a research institute for physics in Boulder, Colo., and discussed physics and the Nobel Prize with Patricia Townsend of the Journal Sentinel staff.

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Fox Valley students get to know robots

Fox Valley students get to know robots
Tech school site of Kuka Robotics training center
By RICK BARRETT
rbarrett@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Nov. 2, 2005

Appleton - When Kuka Robotics Corp. was shopping for a U.S. college to handle specialized training, the German company could have turned to engineering schools at large universities such as UW-Madison or Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Instead it chose Fox Valley Technical College, a two-year degree school in Appleton that had an automated machines curriculum.

"What we were looking for was practical understanding of robotics," said Ben Sagan, Kuka vice president of sales. "Many four-year colleges are dedicated to research. Most of them don't have equipment that even resembles a real industrial robot."

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Protests target homes of animal researchers

Protests target homes of animal researchers
00:00 am 11/03/05
DOUG ERICKSON derickson@madison.com

Activists ratcheted up their opposition to animal experiments at UW-Madison this week by parking a truck with giant video screens outside the homes of animal researchers and broadcasting footage to neighbors of what they said was the torture of monkeys at a campus lab.

Wednesday was the fourth and final night of the group's planned demonstrations in residential neighborhoods. Seven people's homes were visited over the four nights.

"We want to embarrass them," said Jeremy Beckham, 20, of Madison, the main organizer. "We want to educate their neighbors and get them against what's happening."

Chancellor John Wiley criticized the approach in a statement as "a last resort for groups whose message has no traction in our state." He said the university has a long tradition of open discussion on contentious topics, and that the protesters' tactics of "humiliation and intimidation" harm that effort.

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Court to hear medical patent case

Court to hear medical patent case
Published Mon, Oct 31, 2005

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider a patent infringement case involving a test that helps predict strokes, heart attacks and dementia.

A Burlington, N.C.-based company, Laboratory Corp, was accused of infringing on the patent for the test, which detects deficiencies in vitamin B12 or folic acid.

At issue in the company's appeal is whether the patent is invalid because it's not possible to "patent laws of nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas." The Bush administration urged the court to stay out of the case. But justices decided to hear the appeal by Laboratory Corp. Arguments will be held next year.

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Human BioSystems transplants frozen kidney

Human BioSystems transplants frozen kidney

Human BioSystems Inc. said on Wednesday it successfully transplanted a rat kidney that had been frozen for three months in a solution the company created.


Palo Alto-based Human Biosystems (OTCBB:HBSC) said the kidney had been frozen at a temperature of 80 degrees below zero centigrade in its patent-pending HBS Sub-Zero Solution.

"While today's organ preservation technology limits preservation times to only hours, Human BioSystems was able to freeze a rat kidney for 3 months, preserved in the HBS Sub-Zero Solution," Dr. Luis Toledo, Human Biosystems' chief medical officer said in a prepared statement.

The organ was warmed to room temperature before the kidney was transplanted into the animal, which was able to pass urine for one hour before the animal was sacrificed for further tests, Dr. Toledo said.

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Chief Justice Roberts backs out of patent case

Chief Justice Roberts backs out of patent case

Associated Press
Wednesday, November 2, 2005

WASHINGTON - Chief Justice John Roberts took himself out of a patent infringement case Wednesday because of a conflict, acknowledging he made a mistake in taking part in the early stages of the appeal.

Roberts did not explain why he was recusing himself from the case, which justices announced on Monday that they would review.

His former law firm, Hogan & Hartson, had filed the appeal on behalf of Burlington, N.C.-based Laboratory Corp. The company was accused of infringing on the patent for a test that helps predict strokes, heart attacks and dementia.

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Stem cell program may not help taxpayers

Stem cell program may not help taxpayers
IRS doesn't allow royalty payments on tax-exempt bonds
By Rebecca Vesely, STAFF WRITER

SAN FRANCISCO — Despite promises that California taxpayers could reap up to $1 billion in royalties by supporting a state-funded stem cell research program, it is now unclear whether the public will reap any financial reward from the initiative passed overwhelmingly by voters a year ago under Proposition 71.
Taxpayers also could end up paying more than the expected $3 billion in bonds during the next 10 years to fund stem cell research because of restrictions on the types of bonds that can be issued, experts and stakeholders told lawmakers at a hearing Monday.

State Sen. Deborah Ortiz, D-Sacramento, led a daylong hearing on royalties and stem cell research, calling on experts from around the country to testify on the ins and outs of patent and intellectual property law.

"How do we ensure that California residents get a significant return on their investment in stem cell research?" Ortiz, who chairs the subcommittee overseeing the stem cell program, asked at the hearing's outset. "Direct royalties may not be possible if we are using tax-exempt bonds for research grants."

Under Prop. 71, the state is allowed to issue up to $350 million a year over 10 years in either tax-exempt bonds or taxable bonds. Those proceeds would fund stem cell research in the state at universities and private biomedical companies.

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Max Planck scientists show that adult stem cells are possibly just the remnants of evolution

Max Planck scientists show that adult stem cells are possibly just the remnants of evolution

For a fairly long time, adult stem cells have been a point of scientific interest. Besides the question of how to use them therapeutically, researchers have been investigating what exactly their physiological function could be. Not least because undifferentiated cells with features typical of stem cells are being increasingly found in organs like the liver, brain, and muscles, scientists are beginning to assume that these cells play a role in repairing organs. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim, Germany have now demonstrated, in a study published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology, that at least some adult stem cells could be the mere remnants of former embryonal differentiation processes, or, in other words, "footprints" of evolution. (Molecular and Cellular Biology, November 2005)

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UW scientists report a new method to speed bird flu vaccine production

UW scientists report a new method to speed bird flu vaccine production

MADISON - In the event of an influenza pandemic, the world's vaccine manufacturers will be in a race against time to forestall calamity. But now, thanks to a new technique to more efficiently produce the disarmed viruses that are the seed stock for making flu vaccine in large quantities, life-saving inoculations may be available more readily than before. The work is especially important as governments worldwide prepare for a predicted pandemic of avian influenza.

Writing this week (Oct. 31, 2005) in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science (PNAS), a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Tokyo report a new way to generate genetically altered influenza virus. The lab-made virus - whose genes are manipulated to disarm its virulent nature - can be seeded into chicken eggs to generate the vaccine used in inoculations, which prepare the human immune system to recognize and defeat the wild viruses that spread among humans in an epidemic or pandemic.

In their report, a team led by UW-Madison virologists Yoshihiro Kawaoka and Gabriele Neumann, describes an improved "reverse genetics" technique that makes it easier to make a seed virus in monkey kidney cells, which, like tiny factories, churn out millions of copies of the disarmed virus to be used to make vaccines.

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Camtronics Medical Systems is bought by Alabama company

Camtronics Medical Systems is bought by Alabama company
Acquisition turns around a company's fortune
WTN News • Published 11/02/05

Hartland, Wis.—Camtronics Medical Systems, Inc., a maker of cardiology information and imaging systems, has been acquired by Emageon Inc., of Birmingham, Alabama, for $40 million in cash.

Emageon makes digital image management systems for radiologists. The purchase gives each company an entrée into the other's market, said John W. Thompson, president of Thompson Investment Management in Madison and an Emageon board member.

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