USPTO to hold Open Source Software Community Meeting February 16, 2006

USPTO to hold Open Source Software Community Meeting February 16, 2006

The Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has created a partnership with the open source community to ensure that patent examiners have improved access to all available prior art relating to software code during the patent examination process.

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Lloyds offers relief for Linux-patent concerns

Lloyds offers relief for Linux-patent concerns
Offer might attract firms fearing legal action

Roger Howorth, IT Week 18 Aug 2005

Lloyd's of London is to offer insurance to protect firms if patent actions arise from their use of Linux and open-source software.

The offer may attract firms that would not be able to afford the costs of a legal action for patent infringement. Experts estimate that the cost of defending a typical patent case in the US is $3m.

The policy from Lloyd's will be offered in conjunction with software insurance specialist Open Source Risk Management (OSRM), which already offers similar policies and says it will charge firms $60 (£35) per server.

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Open-source allies go on patent offensive

Open-source allies go on patent offensive
By Stephen Shankland, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: August 11, 2005, 4:00 AM PT

SAN FRANCISCO--Two Linux allies are taking a leaf out of their opponents' book as they try to prevent software patents from putting a crimp in open source.

Red Hat will finance outside programmers' efforts to obtain patents that may be used freely by open-source developers, the top Linux seller said Tuesday at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo here. At the same time, the Open Source Developer Labs launched a patent commons project, which will provide a central list of patents that have been donated to the collaborative programming community.

The threat of patent-infringement lawsuits has long dogged collaborative development, leading some open-source programming advocates to turn against the patent system altogether. The initiatives signal a new willingness on the part of the open-source community to combat the threat of patent-infringement lawsuits more directly--and within the existing patent system.

"We're watching a groundswell of alternative ideas coming forward to try to counteract some of the patent terrorism that's coming up in industry," Steve Mills, general manager of IBM's software group, said in an interview.

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Governments in Asia Moving to Open Source

By Ong Boon Kiat, CNETAsia
May 19, 2005

Forget hard figures, the return of investment calculations and the list of new application features. These factors count for little as organizations deciding whether a move to a new IT platform is viable seek a different comfort level. This new level of comfort requires sufficient evidence of successful adoption by others in the industry. It also requires that the move be seen to inspire confidence among partners and customers.

In Asia, one can now argue that both prerequisites have been met when it comes to moving to an open-source platform. It may be hard to state a defining moment when that happened, since comfort is an intangible measure, but it is not hard to sense the optimism that now resonates on the ground with open-source software (OSS).

This confidence stems from the abundant anecdotal evidence that OSS benefits both government and commercial organizations. In Asia, Singapore's Ministry of Defence (Mindef), for instance, saved S$15 million (US$9.3 million) by deciding to let its existing licenses for Office 97 software lapse and to migrate to OpenOffice instead.

Thailand's National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), the nation's IT development agency, has been replacing its fleet of proprietary software with freeware and open-source applications such as GIMP, OpenOffice and Irfanview. NECTEC director Dr. Thaweesak Koanantakool reckons that at a nationwide level, using OSS saved Thailand US$45 million in 2003.

The state-owned Central Bank of India saved US$4 million a year, or reduced 30 percent of its IT expenses, when it adopted Linux to run Oracle applications last year.


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Open source developers step up anti-patent campaign

Open source developers step up anti-patent campaign

Ingrid Marson
ZDNet UK
April 14, 2005, 11:55 BST

Projects hope a taste of one possible future will spur people to action

Developers are using shock tactics to persuade the open source community to get involved in the campaign against software patents.

Over the last month various open source projects have replaced their Web home page with one that outlines the risk that the EU Directive on the Patentability of Computer Implemented Inventions, more commonly known as the Software Patent Directive, could pose to free software.

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Open Source Encourages Start-Ups

Plugged in - Next Big Tech Ideas May Be Small Ones

Sat Apr 2, 7:51 AM ET Technology - Reuters

By Eric Auchard

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Five years after the tech boom went bust, there's a dearth of million dollar or billion dollar ideas, or so some fret.

But it doesn't mean that there is no smart new technology to wow consumers. It's just that people are finding more efficient ways to do it.

Maybe that's because it has never been easier to create potent technology hybrids that mix-and-match hardware components, use a bit of borrowed software code, and require only a few thousand dollars of investment.

From simple Web sites that allow users to share photos or become their own radio broadcasters to do-it-yourself interactive televisions that are being put together to play any sort of TV, photos or Web content for a few hundred dollars, the new breed of inventors aren't counting on a big IPO.

By taking advantage of low-cost computers, freely shared software and high-speed Web connections, the next wave of innovations may not come from any venture-capital funded skunkworks or big business research lab.

"Now people with a good idea are willing to take the risk with $10,000 instead of $10 million. If the idea doesn't pan out they move on," said Justin Chapweske, 26, founder and CEO, of Onion Networks of Lauderdale, Minnesota. "The cost of failure today is just a lot lower."

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Companies help researchers find corn's genetic code

Companies help researchers find corn's genetic code
00:00 am 3/19/05
Jim Suhr AP business writer

ST. LOUIS - A trade group overseeing an effort to unlock corn's genetic code says more than 120 researchers have already used a Web database created to speed up development of biotech crops.

The National Corn Growers Association said this week that the researchers, representing 35 academic institutions, accessed maize gene sequences cataloged in the database.

"There are only little pieces of gene sequences available in the public domain," said Jo Messing, a professor of molecular biology at Rutgers University, who has used the database. "The private collection offers a lot of those missing pieces."

The 8-month-old Web site pools research done on the corn genome by Monsanto Co., DuPont subsidiary Pioneer Hi- Bred International and Monsanto research partner Ceres.

By offering their data to researchers at nonprofit institutions for noncommercial use, the companies hope to develop hybrid and genetically modified plants that are more drought-resistant or can produce more nutritious corn or fibers.

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MIT urges Brazil to adopt open-source

Media Lab letter argues against using Microsoft software
Updated: 7:56 p.m. ET March 17, 2005

SAO PAULO, Brazil - MIT's Media Lab has recommended Brazil install open-source software instead of proprietary software offered by Microsoft on thousands of computers that will be sold to the poor, according to a letter obtained by Reuters Thursday.

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Open-source heads called for Oasis standard boycott

Open-source heads called for Oasis standard boycott
Tensions over patents and royalties continue throughout industry.

By Matthew Broersma, Techworld

Open-source leaders have called for a boycott of standards from the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS), in response to a new OASIS policy on the use of patents in its standards.

In an open letter, more than two dozen prominent figures, including Tim O'Reilly, Bruce Perens, Eric Raymond, Lawrence Rosen, Richard Stallman, Lawrence Lessig and Stuart Cohen, said the patent licensing terms allowed by OASIS' policy "invariably and unreasonably discriminate against open source and free software to the point of prohibiting them entirely". The policy will "lead to the adoption of standards that cannot be implemented in open source and free software, that cannot be distributed under our licenses", the letter stated.

OASIS' revised policy, set to take effect on 15 April, allows standards to include patented technology if the technology is available for license under "reasonable and non-discriminatory" (RAND) terms. However, RAND terms effectively exclude open-source software, which by its nature must be free to distribute with no strings attached.

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Another Patent Portfolio Goes Open Source

CA readies patent pledge
By Martin LaMonica, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: February 18, 2005, 1:02 PM PT

Computer Associates plans to submit a portion of its patent portfolio to open-source developers, following moves by other technology companies delving into open source.

The Islandia, N.Y., company also intends to use its patents to defend against legal action directed at open-source products, according to a company representative. The timing of the patent donation and the terms governing use are still being worked out, the representative said.

CA's decision to make its patents available to others comes on the heels of similar moves by IBM and Sun Microsystems. IBM in January made 500 patents accessible to open-source developers, while Sun released patents related to the open-source Solaris operating system.

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Judge slams SCO's lack of evidence against IBM

Judge slams SCO's lack of evidence against IBM
By Stephen Shankland CNET News.com
February 9, 2005, 9:35 PM PT

The federal judge overseeing the SCO Group's suit against IBM regarding Unix and Linux has thwarted an IBM attempt to defang SCO's claims, but he also voiced loud skepticism about SCO's case.

IBM in 2004 sought a declaration that its Linux activities hadn't violated SCO's purported Unix copyrights, as SCO had claimed publicly and in its lawsuit. Although U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball didn't grant that declaration--called a partial summary judgment--he sharply criticized SCO for not producing evidence for its case.

"Despite the vast disparity between SCO's public accusations and its actual evidence--or complete lack thereof--and the resulting temptation to grant IBM's motion, the court has determined that it would be premature to grant summary judgment," Kimball wrote Wednesday. "Viewed against the backdrop of SCO's plethora of public statements concerning IBM's and others' infringement of SCO's purported copyrights to the Unix software, it is astonishing that SCO has not offered any competent evidence to create a disputed fact regarding whether IBM has infringed SCO's alleged copyrights through IBM's Linux activities."

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Researchers release open-source GM technology

Researchers release open-source GM technology
An Australian research institute has announced the discovery of more effective ways to genetically modify plants.

The technology will be made widely available to try to break the stranglehold of multinational agricultural companies.

The ACT's head of the Centre of the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture (CAMBIA), Richard Jefferson, says any one of hundreds of patent holders can now stop an innovation like a drought resistant grain, getting to farmers.

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Open Source from Microsoft?

Microsoft May Open Code to Windows Forms
By Mary Jo Foley, Microsoft Watch
February 7, 2005

Microsoft officials are continuing to ponder what technologies the company should make more broadly available and how best to do so.

And, in an interesting twist, at least in one case, they are using blogs to debate the details

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World's largest Linux migration gets major boost

World's largest Linux migration gets major boost
The German national railway puts all its weight behind open-source

News Story by Kieren McCarthy

FEBRUARY 04, 2005 (TECHWORLD.COM) - The world's largest Linux migration is speeding ahead, with the German national railway announcing today that it has successfully moved all of its 55,000 Lotus Notes users to the open-source operating system.

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Sun Grants Global Open Source Community Access to More than 1,600 Patents

Sun Grants Global Open Source Community Access to More than 1,600 Patents
Tuesday January 25, 4:07 pm ET
Largest Single Grant in Patent History Spurs Software Innovation

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNW - News) today announced the largest single release of patent innovations into the open source community by any organization to date, marking a significant shift in the way Sun positions its intellectual property portfolio. By giving open source developers free access to Sun(TM) OpenSolaris related patents under the Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL), the company is fostering open innovation and establishing a leadership role in the framework of a patent commons that will be recognized across the globe.

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Discovery moves forward in SCO case

Judge Orders IBM to Turn Over Code in Battle With SCO
Associated Press
Thursday, January 20, 2005; 7:38 PM

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- A federal judge in Utah has ordered IBM to turn over more programming code to The SCO Group Inc., whose lawsuit accuses IBM of illegally inserting proprietary Unix code into the Linux operating system.

The ruling, released late Wednesday, requires International Business Machines Corp. to produce the additional code by March 18.

SCO, based in Lindon, is seeking at least $5 billion from IBM. Wells was ruling on a December motion by SCO claiming that IBM had not provided relevant material, including code and programmers' notes.

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Sun License to Give Developers Patent-Use Rights

Sun License to Give Developers Patent-Use Rights
By Peter Galli
January 19, 2005

The Open Source Initiative has approved Sun Microsystems' CDDL (Common Development and Distribution License), paving the way for the Santa Clara, Calif., company to proceed with its plan to release its Solaris operating system as an open-source project.

But if Sun does use the CDDL for its Open Solaris project, as is expected, one of this license's benefits for developers and the open-source community is that "with the CDDL, if you read it carefully, Sun will convey all of its patents to the community, and not just 500 like IBM recently did, " a source close to the company told eWEEK.

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Linux Rewrite Reports Denied

Linux kernel rewrite claims denied
Ingrid Marson, 18 January 2005
ZDNet UK


Open Source Development Labs has reportedly rejected reports it is leading a revision of the Linux Kernel to remove code that might infringe software patents
Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), which promotes the adoption of the Linux operating system, has denied that it plans to rewrite the Linux kernel to combat claims that it infringes some software patents.

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Debate on Software Patents Becoming Less Polite

Patent Laws in Debate: Conversation Becoming Less Polite

By Jay Fitzgerald
Boston Herald
01/14/05 8:45 AM PT

Jeff Bates, vice president of editorial operations at Open Source Technology Group, said software and other technology patent claims have gotten "silly" in recent years, such as Amazon's recent patent on "one-click" shopping technology.

A behind-the-scenes debate has broken out among techies on whether patent claims have gotten too silly and litigious -- and whether patent laws should be changed.

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Developers voice mixed reactions to IBM patent policy

Developers voice mixed reactions to IBM patent policy
Open source developers contacted express some concerns

By Robert McMillan, IDG News Service
January 12, 2005

IBM's (Profile, Products, Articles) decision to give open source developers unencumbered access to 500 of the company's 40,000 patents was greeted with cautious optimism on Tuesday by some of the open source developers it was intended to help.

Developers who welcomed the gesture also had words of criticism for the practice of creating software patents -- a form of intellectual property (IP) they generally oppose.

IBM has pledged to make the techniques covered by these patents available to companies or individual developers working on open source software, assuaging fears that open source products could someday be the subject of a patent lawsuit by IBM. But the announcement does not cover all of IBM's software patents, and open source developers contacted on Tuesday voiced some concerns.

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I.B.M. to Give Free Access to 500 Patents

I.B.M. to Give Free Access to 500 Patents
By STEVE LOHR

Published: January 11, 2005

I.B.M. plans to announce today that it is making 500 of its software patents freely available to anyone working on open-source projects, like the popular Linux operating system, on which programmers collaborate and share code.

The new model for I.B.M., analysts say, represents a shift away from the traditional corporate approach to protecting ownership of ideas through patents, copyrights, trademark and trade-secret laws. The conventional practice is to amass as many patents as possible and then charge anyone who wants access to them. I.B.M. has long been the champion of that formula. The company, analysts estimate, collected $1 billion or more last year from licensing its inventions.

The move comes after a lengthy internal review by I.B.M., the world's largest patent holder, of its strategy toward intellectual property. I.B.M. executives said the patent donation today would be the first of several such steps.

John Kelly, the senior vice president for technology and intellectual property, called the patent contribution "the beginning of a new era in how I.B.M. will manage intellectual property."

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Linux Sneaks into the Small Business Marketplace

By Robin Miller December 28, 2004

But they don't sell Linux or even tell clients they're using it unless they ask, which most of them don't since they are mainly interested in having their systems run as smoothly as possible for the lowest cost, and don't care what software Ace installs as long as it helps them achieve those two goals.

Ace is one of a growing number of information technology service companies that use Linux and open source software to win computer installation and maintenance contracts from cash-conscious small business managers.

"Our main strategy is to reduce their costs by preventing problems proactively," says Perilstein. Ace accomplishes this typically by remotely monitoring clients' computers so that they can "catch some problems early," including "some we can fix before the customer notices [them]."

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5 Humorous Predictions for Open Source in 2005

Bernard Golden, author of Addison-Wesley's “Succeeding with Open Source,” provides Open Enterprise Trends with his humorous take on What To Watch For in 2005 in the continuously-growing-in-popularity Open Source sector. Whether you're convinced that Open Source is the greatest new technology since the Internet, or still are to be converted, you'll enjoy this list of 5 predictions.

by Bernard Golden
The end of the year is always a good time to sum up the accomplishments of the preceding 12 months and look forward to what the next 12 will bring. For some, future prospects are eagerly awaited with the certainty that things will get much better. For others, the hopes are more modest – only that things won't get worse.

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Sprucing up open source's GPL foundation

By Stephen Shankland CNET News.com December 23, 2004, 4:00 AM PT

Modernization is coming to the General Public License, a legal framework that supports a large part of the free and open-source software movements and that has received sharp criticism from Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates.

GPL author Richard Stallman said he's working on amendments that could deal better with software patents; clarify how GPL software may be used in some networked environments and on carefully controlled hardware; and lower some barriers that today prevent the mixing of software covered by the GPL and other licenses.

In the 13 years since the current GPL version 2 was released, the license has moved from the fringes to the center of the computing industry. GPL software is now common at Fortune 500 companies and endorsed by most large computing firms. But that prominence has made some eager for an update.

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Hybrid Open Source

The Secrets of Open-Source Managing
Start treating your customers like employees.

From: Inc. Magazine, December 2004 | Page 33 By: David H. Freedman
Computer-game maker Valve Software had high hopes for Half-Life 2, an eagerly anticipated sci-fi shoot-'em-up thriller that had been five years in the making. And when the game finally became available over the Internet last year, fans were ecstatic. There was just one problem: Valve hadn't actually released the game. Instead, the code had been snatched by hackers, who'd posted it online for anyone to download. "This could have been a real hit to our bottom line," says Valve marketing chief Doug Lombardi.

. . .

Why would a posse of online gamers -- a group not known for respecting niceties like copyrights -- set out after the liberators of the program they had so eagerly awaited? The answer can be found in the open-source movement, in which software -- the Linux operating system is the best-known example -- is developed by a community of mostly volunteer programmers, and anyone is free to use or modify it. Open-source ideas are fast moving beyond the high-tech world that spawned them. And while few firms are ready to give their products away, a growing number of entrepreneurs are embracing the idea of handing over their intellectual property to a community of volunteer enthusiasts to perform tasks that have long been the province of salaried employees. Call it a "hybrid open-source" model: The company owns the product, but the customers help customize and improve it. "Having people constantly adding to a product extends its life and fills out market niches that the original product wouldn't have reached," says Lars Bo Jeppesen, a visiting scholar at MIT who has studied hybrid open-source efforts.


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Critics Take Issue with Microsoft's Open-Source Patent Claim

Critics pour scorn on Ballmer patent 'FUD'

Andrew Donoghue and Graeme Wearden
ZDNet UK
November 18, 2004, 17:55 GMT

Analysts believe Steve Ballmer's claim that governments who use Linux face the threat of patent lawsuits could rebound on Microsoft, while open-source vendors accuse it of spreading more fear, uncertainty and doubt

Steve Ballmer's claim that governments which use Linux face the risk of patent lawsuits drew a dismissive response from some in the IT industry on Thursday.

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Microsoft issues warning about Linux lawsuits

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Microsoft has warned Asian governments they could face patent lawsuits for using the Linux operating system instead of its Windows software.

The growing popularity of Linux -- an open-code software that is freely available on the Internet and easily modified by users -- is a threat to the global dominance of Microsoft's Windows.

Linux violates more than 228 patents, Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer said at the company's Asian Government Leaders Forum in Singapore on Thursday. He did not provide any details on the alleged violations, which the Linux community disputes.

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Sun To Take On Linux with Free and Open Solaris

By Timothy Prickett Morgan

Sun Microsystems Inc has been talking about its plans for its Solaris 10 operating system so much that it is sometimes hard to remember that it wasn't actually announced until today. Finally, after 3,000 engineering years and over $500m in research and development spread over several years, Solaris 10, with over 600 new features, is being unveiled at the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, California.

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U.S. Government, Industry To Accelerate Development Of New Open-Source Infiniband Software

Under the terms of the award, Voltaire will lead a group of leading InfiniBand companies including Intel and Topspin Communications to accelerate the production of a single open-source software stack to meet the scalability, performance, portability, reliability and manageability requirements of large clusters for the NNSA national laboratories and the wider HPC community. The multi-year project will accelerate the efforts to include the OpenIB stack as part of the standard Linux kernel and is expected to include additional OpenIB contributors in later stages.

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Is Patent Protection an Innovation Tax?

Euro patent rebels attack innovation tax

Increased litigation and licensing costs could drive European open-source software developers and small IT companies out of business if the EU approves software patenting laws.

"We are very afraid of litigation costs," said Jean-Paul Smets-Solanes of software development company Nexedi Sarl at a conference in Brussels organised by, among others, the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure and Green Party Euro MPs.

A directive could force innovative companies out of business by forcing them to pay licence fees to avoid infringing patent rights. Smets-Solanes said big IT companies could buy IT patents and use them to threaten legal action and block the sale of new products.

"If we are trying to push our products, there are 10,000 patents out there which any large company can buy and then say to us, 'Give us your patent. We don't want you to sell your new product because we want to include it on our server,'" he said.

Open-source software pioneer Bruce Perens predicted even grimmer times for small companies.

"An increased regime of patent protection spells doom for small and medium-sized enterprises engaged in software development in Europe," he said.

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Open Source Patent License

FSF recommends express patent licences

By Andrew Colley, ZDNet Australia

The Free Software Foundation has put forward a recommendation to those distributing software under free and open-source licences to help them avoid legal pitfalls.

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Open Source Solaris Stalls

November 4, 2004
Open Source Solaris Stalls
By Michael Singer

If you were expecting a sneak peak of an open source Solaris or to buy a commercial version when it launches on Nov. 15, don't hold your breath.

Although Sun Microsystems said it is on track to officially launch Solaris 10, the next-generation server operating system, on Nov. 15 at its Network Computing 04Q4 event in San Jose, the products will actually take a bit longer.

Glenn Weinberg, vice president of the Operating Platforms Group at Sun, said the company's goal is not to "dribble it out" or release a "half-baked" OS, but to have something that is ready to go.

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Linux in Schools

Linux Making Headway in Primary Education

By Susan B. Shor
LinuxInsider
11/01/04 5:00 AM PT

A recent Quality Education Data report found that 19 percent of schools surveyed were beginning to experiment with Linux on their servers. That's not many compared to Windows-based systems' presence in 86 percent of schools and the availability of Apple's OS9 and OSX in 34 percent.

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Open-source software ready for government-wide adoption

Open-source software is ready for mainstream adoption in government, according to an office of government commerce report published today.

The conclusions drawn from pilot implementations of open-source software in a variety of government bodies earlier this year show that open-source software can create savings for the public sector, particularly in conjunction with server consolidation.

The report published by the OGC also said that open-source software is a viable desktop alternative without creating problems with interoperability.

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Open Source in Space

U.S., International Space Organizations Turn to Open Source

NASA, international counterparts are relying on open-source operating systems, e-mail and other programs to manage terrestrial and orbital functions.

By Larry Greenemeier, InformationWeek
Oct. 26, 2004

Open source is reaching new heights as space organizations look to this communally developed software to power both terrestrial and orbital operations. Both the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organization, in particular, are using open-source software to build, guide, and repair critical satellite systems.

The use of open source is fairly widespread throughout NASA. Open source is being used is as the operating system of Project Columbia. SGI's Linux-based Altix system operates at the heart of Project Columbia, which consists of a 10,240-processor Space Exploration Simulator supercomputer built to help NASA scientists with space exploration, global warming research, and aerospace engineering.

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Take Care of Your IP When Working with Open Source

Open Source: Handle with Care To Protect IP

Take technical and/or legal steps to separate open-source code from proprietary code. If your product can legally be viewed as a derivative work of the open-source code, you can lose rights. To avoid that, proprietary code should be dynamically linked to open-source code through a previously established interface.


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SGI To Open-Source SpeedShop

SGI To Open-Source SpeedShop
October 22, 2004
Summary
With funding from the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), SGI says it's developing a new open source version of its traditionally Irix-based SpeedShop performance analysis tool to accelerate high-performance Linux-based systems. It'll be called Open/SpeedShop and should be ready in 2006.

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Anti-Patent Campaign in Europe

Red Hat and MySQL Back European Anti-Patent Campaign

Open source software vendors Red Hat Inc and MySQL AB have lent their support to a campaign against software patents in the European Union that launched yesterday under the name NoSoftwarePatents.com.

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Open Source Philosophy Moves to Biotech

‘Open-Source’ Initiative Aims to Save Biotech

By Graeme O'Neill
Australian Biotechnology News (online)

(10/14/04)—This month, an international movement was quietly born — one that aims to loosen the grip of the world’s biggest life science corporations on key enabling technologies and patents for biotechnology R&D.

The Biological Innovation for an Open Society (BIOS) initiative is the creation of U.S.-born molecular geneticist Dr. Richard Jefferson, founder and CEO of the CAMBIA (Centre for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture) in Canberra.

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Unisys signs up Linux allies

Unisys signs up Linux allies
Published: October 19, 2004, 4:16 PM PDT
By Stephen Shankland
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

Unisys, a server maker that only recently caught the Linux bug, plans to announce on Wednesday a new partnership with business research software maker the SAS Institute. In addition, Unisys plans to unveil its membership in Open Source Development Labs, a prominent Linux consortium that includes the company's major rivals.

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Spotting open-source code

Tool for spotting open-source code launched
Ingrid Marson
ZDNet UK
October 18, 2004, 18:10 BST
US-based Black Duck Software on Monday released code designed to allow lawyers to resolve the intellectual property issues around open-source software.

This is the latest offering from the company, which released two IP products for developers in May this year. ProtextIP/development highlights potential licence issues through consulting a knowledge base of open-source code and associated licences, while protexIP/registry allows employees to put code it has developed into the knowledge base to assure customers and partners that it has followed best practice in software compliance.

Black Duck claims that software vendors often resolve IP issues only at the end of the development process, when they're under the pressure of a looming product shipment deadline. Its latest product, ProtexIP/license management, aims to help users avoid this by enabling corporate legal teams to monitor open-source code throughout the software development process.

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UW -- The Croquet Project

UW-Madison makes next generation computing environment available
(Posted: 10/18/2004)

Brian Rust

The Croquet Project, a joint software development effort among the Division of Information Technology (DoIT), the University of Minnesota and Viewpoints Research Institute, Inc. of Glendale California, has announced the release of the Croquet developers' release code named "Jasmine." Jasmine is a new open-source software technology and peer-to-peer network architecture that supports online learning and resource sharing among large numbers of users.


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Novell and Open Source

Novell Pledges To Protect Open Source Against Legal Claims

By Jay Wrolstad
Enterprise Linux IT
October 14, 2004 1:08PM

Novell has pledged to use its patent portfolio to protect the company's open-source software against potential intellectual-property rights litigation. The Novell announcement followed a similar declaration by IBM, which has promised not to use its patents against Linux vendors.

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